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COVID-19 vaccine facts infographic.


COVID-19 Vaccine Facts (Text Version)

[Band-aids in the shape of a check mark]
The vaccines are safe.
Scientists worked for decades to develop the technology used in the vaccines. Millions of people have safely received COVID-19 vaccines.

[Virus icon]
The vaccines will not make you sick with COVID-19.
The vaccines teach your immune system how to spot and fight off the virus. Some people may have short-term side effects, such as pain in the arm where you got your shot, tiredness, or fever. This means your body is building protection.

[Outline of a woman's head and torso]
The vaccines protect you.
COVID-19 vaccines give you powerful protection against the virus, including variants. Getting vaccinated helps protect you from serious illness and death. The COVID-19 vaccines may give you better protection than even a previous COVID-19 infection.

[Outline of a pregnant woman]
The vaccines protect you during pregnancy.
If you are pregnant, you are more likely to get seriously ill from COVID-19 than those who are not pregnant. Getting vaccinated can help protect you. Your vaccine may also help protect your baby from the virus after birth.

[Fetus icon]
The vaccines will not affect your fertility.
Vaccinated people get pregnant at the same rates as those who are unvaccinated. Experts recommend COVID-19 vaccines for anyone who wants to get pregnant in the future.

[Three figures in front of a globe]
The vaccines are widely available
You can get a vaccine regardless of your immigration or health insurance status.

Learn more at acog.org/womens-health/covid-19 and check vaccines.gov to find a vaccine near you.

PFSI035. Copyright May 2022 by the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, posted on the internet, or transmitted, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise, without prior written permission from the publisher.

This information is designed as an educational aid for the public. It offers current information and opinions related to women’s health. It is not intended as a statement of the standard of care. It does not explain all of the proper treatments or methods of care. It is not a substitute for the advice of a physician. For ACOG’s complete disclaimer, visit www.acog.org/WomensHealth-Disclaimer.

This Resource was supported by the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) as a part of a financial assistance award totaling $3,000,000 with 100 percent funded by ACOG and CDC/HHS. The contents are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily represent the official views of, nor an endorsement, by CDC/HHS, or the U.S. Government.

PFSI035

Published: May 2022

Last reviewed: May 2022

Copyright 2022 by the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. All rights reserved. Read copyright and permissions information.

This information is designed as an educational aid for the public. It offers current information and opinions related to women's health. It is not intended as a statement of the standard of care. It does not explain all of the proper treatments or methods of care. It is not a substitute for the advice of a physician. Read ACOG’s complete disclaimer.