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The health and economic benefits of paid parental leave are well documented. The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) endorses paid parental leave as essential. Paid parental leave includes maintenance of full benefits and 100% of pay for at least six weeks. Those who choose to have children should not face discrimination, and discrimination on the basis of pregnancy is explicitly prohibited. (1, 2) Workers who choose to have children make an equal commitment to the workplace and training environment as those who do not. Workers eligible for paid parental leave include ...


Statement of Policy 091, May 2015

Advocacy on behalf of women’s health is central to our mission. The United States Congress and Statehouses are increasingly affecting the practice of medicine, our specialty’s ability to care for our patients, and the future of women’s health. The American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists supports member involvement in legislative and political advocacy to help ensure that lawmakers and government entities make informed decisions on issues related to women’s health.


(Reaffirmed July 2014)

Access to maternity care is an important public health concern in the United States. Providing comprehensive perinatal services to a diverse population requires a cooperative relationship among a variety of health professionals, including social workers, health educators, nurses and physicians. Prenatal care, labor and delivery, and postpartum care have historically been provided by midwives, family physicians and obstetricians. All three remain the major caregivers today. A cooperative and collaborative relationship among obstetricians, family physicians and nurse midwives is essential for p...


4.
November 2014

Statement of Policy (Revised and approved November 2014), November 2014

The following statement is the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists’ (ACOG) general policy related to abortion. The College’s clinical guidelines related to abortion and additional information are contained in the relevant Practice Bulletins, Committee Opinions, and other College documents.


(Reaffirmed July 2016)

Excellence in women’s health care is an essential element of the long-term physical, intellectual, social and economic well-being of any society. It is a basic determinant of the health of future generations.


(Approved by the Executive Board February 2008, Revised and Approved July 2012)

Resident training in obstetrics and gynecology incorporates the full spectrum of obstetric and gynecologic practice as defined in the special requirements promulgated by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME). These include diagnostic, therapeutic and operative procedures used in the practice of the specialty. The certification process of the American Board of Obstetrics and Gynecology Inc. (ABOG) evaluates medical knowledge and patient care skills of individual practitioners in the broad range of obstetrics, gynecology and women’s health care. The Maintenance of Cer...


Statement of Policy (Reaffirmed July 2011), July 2011

Members Only


Statement of Policy (Approved by the Executive Board July 2012), July 2012

Acknowledging the significant interplay of women's human rights with the overall health of women and society, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists and the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) ardently support efforts to improve the dignity, autonomy, rights and health of women in the United States and globally.


9.
February 2014

Statement of Policy (Approved by the Executive Board February 2014), February 2014

The impact of gun violence on the health and safety of women is of great concern to obstetrician–gynecologists. Women disproportionately experience intimate partner violence, and the presence of firearms within those relationships is a key risk factor for intimate partner homicide. Homicide is the second leading cause of injury-related deaths among pregnant and postpartum women, and the majority of these homicides are carried out with firearms.


Statement of Policy (Reaffirmed July 2014), July 2014

The problem of perinatal transmission of HIV infection was first appreciated in 1982. In 1991, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) recommended a policy of routine counseling and offering testing (with specific informed consent) for HIV infection to all pregnant women. Since 1991, there have been major advances in the treatment of HIV infection, including demonstration in 1994 of the efficacy of zidovudine to reduce perinatal transmission. The U.S. Public Health Service subsequently issued guidelines for use of zidovudine to reduce perinatal transmission and for counseling and voluntary testing fo...


American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists
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