Search Results

Results 1–10 of 20
Sort By: Relevance| Date| Title

Number Number 722, October 2017

(Replaces Committee Opinion No. 637, July 2015)

ABSTRACT: Cannabis sativa (marijuana) is the illicit drug most commonly used during pregnancy. The self-reported prevalence of marijuana use during pregnancy ranges from 2% to 5% in most studies. A growing number of states are legalizing marijuana for medicinal or recreational purposes, and its use by pregnant women could increase even further as a result. Because of concerns regarding impaired neurodevelopment, as well as maternal and fetal exposure to the adverse effects of smoking, women who are pregnant or contemplating pregnancy should be encouraged to discontinue marijuana use. Obstetri...


2.
September 2017

Members Only


SP029 Los beneficios para su bebé y para usted La lactancia materna es lo mejor para su bebé por los siguientes motivos: • La leche materna contiene la cantidad correcta de grasa, azúcar, agua, proteínas y minerales necesarios La lactancia materna y su bebé The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists WOMEN’S HEALTH CARE PHYSICIANS PATIENT EDUCATI N La Atención Durante el Trabajo de Parto, el Parto y el Postparto • SP029 para el crecimiento y desarrollo de un bebé. A medida que el bebé se desarrolla, la leche materna cambia para adaptarse a las necesidades nutricio...


4.
November 2016

Number FAQ029, November 2016

How long should I breastfeed my baby? Exclusive breastfeeding is recommended for the first 6 months of a baby’s life. Breastfeeding should continue up to the baby’s first birthday as new foods are introduced. You can keep breastfeeding after the baby’s first birthday for as long as you and your baby would like.


5.
October 2016

Number AP029, October 2016

Members Only


Number AB021, July 2016

Members Only


Number Number 666, June 2016

ABSTRACT: In the weeks after birth, postpartum care often is fragmented among maternal and pediatric health care providers, and communication between inpatient and outpatient settings is inconsistent. To optimize postpartum care, anticipatory guidance should begin during pregnancy. During antenatal care, it is recommended that the patient and her obstetrician–gynecologist or other obstetric care provider formulate a postpartum care plan and identify the health care professionals who will comprise the postpartum care team for the woman and her infant. Ideally, during the postpartum period, a s...


Number Number 658, February 2016

(Replaces Committee Opinion Number 361, February 2007) (Reaffirmed 2017)

ABSTRACT: Although most women in the United States initiate breastfeeding, more than one half wean earlier than they desire. As reproductive health experts and advocates for women’s health who work in conjunction with other obstetric and pediatric health care providers, obstetrician–gynecologists are uniquely positioned to enable women to achieve their infant feeding goals. The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists recommends exclusive breastfeeding for the first 6 months of life, with continued breastfeeding as complementary foods are introduced through the infant’s first year ...


(Reaffirmed July 2014)

The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (the College) and the American College of Nurse-Midwives (ACNM) affirm our shared goal of safe women's health care in the United States through the promotion of evidence-based models provided by obstetrician–gynecologists (ob-gyns), certified nurse-midwives (CNMs), and certified midwives (CMs). The College and ACNM believe health care is most effective when it occurs in a system that facilitates communication across care settings and among providers. Ob-gyns and CNMs/CMs are experts in their respective fields of practice and are educated...


Number Number 570, August 2013

(Reaffirmed 2016)

ABSTRACT: Maternal and infant benefits from breastfeeding are well documented and are especially important to underserved women. Underserved women are disproportionately likely to experience adverse health outcomes that may improve with breastfeeding. They face unique barriers and have low rates of initiation and continuation of breastfeeding. Through a multidisciplinary approach that involves practitioners, family members, and child care providers, obstetrician–gynecologists can help underserved women overcome obstacles and obtain the benefits of breastfeeding for themselves and their infant...


American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists
409 12th Street SW, Washington, DC  20024-2188 | Mailing Address: PO Box 70620, Washington, DC 20024-9998