Search Results

Results 1–10 of 27
Sort By: Relevance| Date| Title

FAQ156, April 2018

How does pregnancy begin? Fertilization, the union of an egg and a sperm into a single cell, is the first step in a complex series of events that leads to pregnancy. Fertilization takes place in the fallopian tube. Over the next few days, the single cell divides into multiple cells. At the same time, the small cluster of dividing cells moves through the fallopian tube to the lining of the uterus. There it implants and starts to grow. From implantation until the end of the eighth week of pregnancy, it is called an embryo. From the ninth week of pregnancy until birth, it is called a fetus.


FAQ027, February 2018

What is the Rh factor? The Rh factor is a protein that can be found on the surface of red blood cells. If your blood cells have this protein, you are Rh positive. If your blood cells do not have this protein, you are Rh negative.


3.
February 2018

FAQ001, February 2018

How can I plan healthy meals during pregnancy? The United States Department of Agriculture has made it easier to plan meals during pregnancy by creating www.choosemyplate.gov. This website helps everyone from dieters and children to pregnant women learn how to make healthy food choices at each mealtime.


4.
November 2017

FAQ177, November 2017

What is gestational diabetes (GD)? Diabetes mellitus (also called “diabetes”) is a condition in which too much glucose (sugar) stays in the blood instead of being used for energy. Health problems can occur when blood sugar is too high. Some women develop diabetes for the first time during pregnancy. This condition is called gestational diabetes (GD). Women with GD need special care both during and after pregnancy.


5.
September 2017

FAQ060, September 2017

Why is there a concern about having a child later in life? Becoming pregnant after age 35 years can present a challenge. Also, having a child later in life has certain risks. These risks may affect a woman’s health as well as her baby’s health.


6.
September 2017

FAQ133, September 2017

Why are tests done during pregnancy? A number of lab tests are suggested for all women as part of routine prenatal care. These tests can help find conditions that can increase the risk of complications for you and your fetus.


7.
September 2017

FAQ105, September 2017

What is group B streptococcus (GBS)? Group B streptococcus is one of the many types of bacteria that live in the body and usually do not cause serious illness. It is found in the digestive, urinary, and reproductive tracts of men and women. In women, it can be found in the vagina and rectum. GBS is not a sexually transmitted infection (STI). Also, although the names are similar, GBS is different from group A streptococcus, the bacteria that causes “strep throat.”


FAQ165, July 2017

What is prenatal genetic testing? Prenatal genetic testing gives parents-to-be information about whether their fetus has certain genetic disorders.


9.
July 2017

FAQ113, July 2017

What is human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)? Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is the virus that causes acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS).


FAQ119, July 2017

Is it safe to exercise during pregnancy? If you are healthy and your pregnancy is normal, it is safe to continue or start most types of exercise, but you may need to make a few changes. Physical activity does not increase your risk of miscarriage, low birth weight, or early delivery. However, it is important to discuss exercise with your obstetrician or other member of your health care team during your early prenatal visits. If your health care professional gives you the OK to exercise, you can decide together on an exercise routine that fits your needs and is safe during pregnancy.


American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists
409 12th Street SW, Washington, DC  20024-2188 | Mailing Address: PO Box 70620, Washington, DC 20024-9998