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FAQ046, January 2015

What is dysmenorrhea? Pain associated with menstruation is called dysmenorrhea.


22.
April 2015

PFS003, April 2015

Menopause is the time in a woman’s life when she naturally stops having menstrual periods. Menopause marks the end of the reproductive years. The average age of menopause for women in the United States is 51 years. Most women enter a transitional phase in the years leading up to menopause called perimenopause. Perimenopause is a time of gradual change in the levels of estrogen, a hormone that helps control the menstrual cycle. Changing estrogen levels can bring on symptoms such as hot flashes and sleep changes. To manage these symptoms, some women may choose to take hormone therapy.


23.
April 2017

FAQ075, April 2017

What is an ovarian cyst? An ovarian cyst is a sac or pouch filled with fluid or other tissue that forms in or on an ovary. Ovarian cysts are very common. They can occur during the childbearing years or after menopause. Most ovarian cysts are benign (not cancer) and go away on their own without treatment. Rarely, a cyst may be malignant (cancer) (see FAQ096 Ovarian Cancer).


24.
December 2015

FAQ163, December 2015

What is cancer of the cervix? A woman’s cervix (the opening of the uterus at the top of the vagina) is covered by a thin layer of tissue made up of cells. Healthy cells grow, divide, and are replaced as needed. Cancer of the cervix occurs when these cells change. Cancer cells divide more rapidly. They may grow into deeper cell layers or spread to other organs. The cancer cells eventually form a mass of tissue called a tumor.


25.
April 2015

FAQ135, April 2015

What is colposcopy? Colposcopy is a way of looking at the cervix through a special magnifying device called a colposcope. It shines a light into the vagina and onto the cervix. A colposcope can greatly enlarge the normal view. This exam allows the health care provider to find problems that cannot be seen by the eye alone.


PFSI010 ››› Weeks 1–4 Weeks 5–8 Weeks 9–12 Weeks 13–16 Weeks 17–20 Weeks 21–24 • Timing: 10–13 weeks • Blood test plus NT ultrasound exam • Screens for Down • syndrome and trisomy 18 First-trimester screening Second-trimester screening (“quad screen”) • Timing: 15–22 weeks • Blood test • Screens for Down syndrome, trisomy 13, trisomy 18, and NTDs Standard ultrasound exam • Timing: 18–22 weeks • Screens for some physical defects Integrated screening and sequential screening • Timing: 10–22 weeks • Combines first-trimester and second-trimester screening test results in vari...


FAQ150, May 2017

When should I have my first gynecologic visit? An obstetrician–gynecologist (ob–gyn) is a doctor who specializes in the health care of women. Girls should have their first gynecologic visit between the ages of 13 years and 15 years.


TFAQ001, February 2016

What does “LGBT” stand for? “LGBT” is an abbreviation for “lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender.” These terms describe a person’s sexual orientation—a person’s emotional or sexual attraction to other people: • “Gay” describes a person (either male or female) who is attracted to people of the same sex. • “Straight” describes a person (either male or female) who is attracted to people of the opposite sex. • A “lesbian” is a female who is attracted to other females. • “Bisexual” describes a person (either male or female) who is attracted to people of both sexes.


FAQ077, September 2015

What is pelvic inflammatory disease (PID)? Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) is an infection of the female reproductive organs. It is a common illness. PID is diagnosed in more than 1 million women each year in the United States.


30.
January 2016

FAQ115, January 2016

What causes back pain during pregnancy? The following changes during pregnancy can lead to back pain: Strain on your back muscles Abdominal muscle weakness Pregnancy hormones


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