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PFS001, July 2011

To achieve the best health, you need to be an active member of your health care team. One way to be involved in your health care is to prepare for and actively participate in your visits with your health care provider. This fact sheet outlines steps you can take to get the most from your health care visit.


152.
May 2011

FAQ074, May 2011

What are uterine fibroids? Uterine fibroids are benign (not cancer) growths that develop from the muscle tissue of the uterus. They also are called leiomyomas or myomas. The size, shape, and location of fibroids can vary greatly. They may be present inside the uterus, on its outer surface or within its wall, or attached to it by a stem-like structure. A woman may have only one fibroid or many of varying sizes. A fibroid may remain very small for a long time and suddenly grow rapidly, or grow slowly over a number of years.


153.
May 2011

FAQ147, May 2011

What is endometrial hyperplasia? Endometrial hyperplasia is a condition that occurs when the lining of the uterus (endometrium) grows too much. It is a benign (not cancer) condition. In some cases, however, it can lead to cancer of the uterus.


FAQ162, May 2011

What are menopause and perimenopause? Menopause is defined as the absence of menstrual periods for 1 year. The average age of menopause is 51 years, but the normal range is 45 years to 55 years. The years leading up to this point are called perimenopause. This term means "around menopause." This phase can last for up to 10 years. During perimenopause, shifts in hormone levels can affect ovulation and cause changes in the menstrual cycle.


FAQ004, May 2011

What happens when labor begins? As labor begins, the cervix opens (dilates). The uterus, which contains muscle, contracts at regular intervals. When it contracts, the abdomen becomes hard. Between the contractions, the uterus relaxes and becomes soft. Up to the start of labor and during early labor, the baby will continue to move.


American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists
409 12th Street SW, Washington, DC  20024-2188 | Mailing Address: PO Box 70620, Washington, DC 20024-9998