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FAQ500, March 2018

Why should I think about using birth control right after I have a baby? It is possible to get pregnant very soon after having a baby if you have sex and do not use birth control. Some women can become pregnant even before their menstrual periods return. Starting a birth control method immediately after you have a baby can help you avoid an unintended pregnancy. It also lets you control if or when you want to become pregnant again.


FAQ184, January 2018

What are long-acting reversible contraception methods? The intrauterine device (IUD) and the birth control implant are long-acting reversible contraception methods. Both are highly effective in preventing pregnancy. They last for several years and are easy to use. Both methods are reversible—if you want to get pregnant or if you want to stop using them, you can have them removed at any time.


FAQ114, May 2019

What is emergency contraception? Emergency contraception (EC) reduces the chance of pregnancy after unprotected sexual intercourse. Common situations in which EC could be used include forgetting to take several birth control pills in a row, having a condom break or slip off, or not using a birth control method during sex. It also can be used after a woman has been raped.


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February 2018

FAQ194, February 2018

cervical cap are much less effective in women who have given birth. What is an intrauterine device? The intrauterine device (IUD) is a small, T-shaped device that your obstetrician–gynecologist (ob-gyn) or other health care professional inserts into your uterus. IUDs usually can be inserted right... after a vaginal or cesarean delivery or at your first postpartum health care visit. The hormonal IUD releases a small amount of progestin into the uterus and is approved for up to 3-5 years of use, depending on the kind you get. The copper IUD releases a small amount of copper into the uterus and is


Birth Control Learn about choosing the right birth control method for you. Some examples include the birth control pill, intrauterine device (IUD), patch, condom, or implant. Cancer Screening Learn more about breast cancer, colon cancer, or other types of cancer. Vaccinations Get vaccinations


Birth Control Learn about choosing the right birth control method for you. Some examples include the birth control pill, intrauterine device (IUD), patch, condom, or implant. Cancer Screening Learn more about breast cancer, colon cancer, or other types of cancer. Vaccinations Get vaccinations


FAQ186, March 2018

What is progestin? Progestin is a form of progesterone, a hormone that plays a role in the menstrual cycle and pregnancy. Progestin is used in combination with another hormone called estrogen in combined hormonal birth control pills, the vaginal ring, and the skin patch. It also can be used by itself in progestin-only pills and the birth control injection. The birth control implant and the hormonal intrauterine device also are progestin-only forms of birth control and are discussed in FAQ184 Long-Acting Reversible Contraception.


FAQ035, August 2019

What is sterilization? Sterilization is a permanent method of birth control. It is the most popular form of birth control worldwide.


FAQ052, May 2016

What is sterilization? Sterilization is a permanent method of birth control. Sterilization for women is called tubal sterilization. In tubal sterilization, the fallopian tubes are closed off or removed. Tubal sterilization prevents the egg from moving down the fallopian tube to the uterus and keeps the sperm from reaching the egg (see the FAQ011 “Sterilization for Women and Men”).


FAQ112, May 2019

What things should I think about when choosing a birth control method? To choose the right birth control method for you, consider the following: How well it prevents pregnancy How easy it is to use Whether you need a prescription to get it Whether it protects against sexually transmitted infections (STIs) Whether you have any health problems


American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists
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