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FAQ184, January 2018

What are long-acting reversible contraception methods? The intrauterine device (IUD) and the birth control implant are long-acting reversible contraception methods. Both are highly effective in preventing pregnancy. They last for several years and are easy to use. Both methods are reversible—if you want to get pregnant or if you want to stop using them, you can have them removed at any time.


FAQ500, March 2018

Why should I think about using birth control right after I have a baby? It is possible to get pregnant very soon after having a baby if you have sex and do not use birth control. Some women can become pregnant even before their menstrual periods return. Starting a birth control method immediately after you have a baby can help you avoid an unintended pregnancy. It also lets you control if or when you want to become pregnant again.


FAQ114, May 2019

What is emergency contraception? Emergency contraception (EC) reduces the chance of pregnancy after unprotected sexual intercourse. Common situations in which EC could be used include forgetting to take several birth control pills in a row, having a condom break or slip off, or not using a birth control method during sex. It also can be used after a woman has been raped.


FAQ112, May 2019

What things should I think about when choosing a birth control method? To choose the right birth control method for you, consider the following: How well it prevents pregnancy How easy it is to use Whether you need a prescription to get it Whether it protects against sexually transmitted infections (STIs) Whether you have any health problems


5.
February 2018

FAQ194, February 2018

cervical cap are much less effective in women who have given birth. What is an intrauterine device? The intrauterine device (IUD) is a small, T-shaped device that your obstetrician–gynecologist (ob-gyn) or other health care professional inserts into your uterus. IUDs usually can be inserted right... after a vaginal or cesarean delivery or at your first postpartum health care visit. The hormonal IUD releases a small amount of progestin into the uterus and is approved for up to 3-5 years of use, depending on the kind you get. The copper IUD releases a small amount of copper into the uterus and is


Birth Control Learn about choosing the right birth control method for you. Some examples include the birth control pill, intrauterine device (IUD), patch, condom, or implant. Cancer Screening Learn more about breast cancer, colon cancer, or other types of cancer. Vaccinations Get vaccinations


Birth Control Learn about choosing the right birth control method for you. Some examples include the birth control pill, intrauterine device (IUD), patch, condom, or implant. Cancer Screening Learn more about breast cancer, colon cancer, or other types of cancer. Vaccinations Get vaccinations


8.
October 2018

FAQ084, October 2018

What is hysteroscopy? Hysteroscopy is used to diagnose or treat problems of the uterus. A hysteroscope is a thin, lighted telescope-like device. It is inserted through your vagina into your uterus. The hysteroscope transmits the image of your uterus onto a screen. Other instruments are used along with the hysteroscope for treatment.


TFAQ004, June 2019

pregnancy. It is best to use condoms and another method of birth control, such as an intrauterine device (IUD) or a birth control implant, to protect against pregnancy and STIs. What should I know about pregnancy after a medical transition? Some kinds of hormone treatments may make it harder for you to have...? These are common problems that can be treated. Options may include birth control pills, a birth control shot, or an IUD. Talk with your ob-gyn or other health care professional about your options. What other health risks should I know about? Many parents, communities, and schools support teens who are


FAQ022, March 2018

What are barrier methods of birth control? Barrier methods of birth control act as barriers to keep the man’s sperm from reaching the woman’s egg. Some barrier methods also protect against sexually transmitted infections (STIs). A few barrier methods (spermicide, condom, and sponge) can be bought in most drugstores. Others (diaphragm and cervical cap) must be prescribed by a health care professional.


American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists
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