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alcohol and pregnancy


FAQ197, October 2018


FAQ056, October 2018

What is a prepregnancy care checkup? The goal of this checkup is to find things that could affect your pregnancy. Identifying these factors before pregnancy allows you to take steps that can increase the chances of having a healthy pregnancy and a healthy baby. During this visit, your health care professional will ask about your diet and lifestyle, your medical and family history, medications you take, and any past pregnancies


FAQ060, July 2018

How does age affect fertility? A woman’s peak reproductive years are between the late teens and late 20s. By age 30 years, fertility (the ability to get pregnant) starts to decline. This decline becomes more rapid once you reach your mid 30s. By age 45 years, fertility has declined so much that getting pregnant naturally is unlikely for most women.


5.
September 2017

FAQ060, September 2017

The information on this page has been replaced with FAQ060, "Having a Baby After Age 35: How Aging Affects Fertility and Pregnancy."


FAQ056, April 2017

The information on this page has been replaced with FAQ 056, "Good Health Before Pregnancy: Prepregnancy Care."


7.
April 2017

FAQ179, April 2017

Pregnancy What is carrier screening? What is a carrier? What are the chances of having a child with a genetic disorder? How is carrier screening done? When can carrier screening be done? Do I have to have carrier screening? What carrier screening tests are available? Who should have carrier screening? What is targeted carrier screening? What is expanded carrier screening? Is one approach better than the other? What choices do I have if my partner and I are carriers of a genetic disorder? How accurate is carrier screening? Are results...


8.
April 2017

FAQ094, April 2017

What are genes? A gene is a small piece of hereditary material called DNA that controls some aspect of a person’s physical makeup or a process in the body. Genes come in pairs.


9.
April 2016

FAQ182, April 2016

Being overweight is defined as having a body mass index (BMI) of 25–29.9. Obesity is defined as having a BMI of 30 or greater. Within the general category of obesity, there are three levels that reflect the increasing health risks that go along with increasing BMI: • Lowest risk is a BMI of 30–34.9. • Medium risk is a BMI of 35.0–39.9. • Highest risk is a BMI of 40 or greater.


FAQ189, October 2015

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