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FAQ093, September 2019

What are hepatitis B and hepatitis C infections? Hepatitis B and hepatitis C are serious infections that affect the liver. Both diseases are contagious and caused by viruses. Both can lead to serious, long-term illness.


FAQ165, September 2019

What is prenatal genetic testing? Prenatal genetic testing gives parents-to-be information about whether their fetus has certain genetic disorders.


3.
September 2019

FAQ038, September 2019

Does bleeding during pregnancy always mean that there is a problem? Vaginal bleeding during pregnancy has many causes. Some are serious, whereas others are not. Bleeding can occur early or later in pregnancy. Bleeding in early pregnancy is common. In many cases, it does not signal a major problem. Bleeding later in pregnancy can be more serious. It is best to contact your obstetrician–gynecologist (ob-gyn) or other health care professional if you have any bleeding at any time during pregnancy.


4.
August 2019

FAQ173, August 2019

When is a baby considered “preterm” or “extremely preterm?” A normal pregnancy lasts about 40 weeks. Babies born before 37 weeks of pregnancy are called “preterm” or “premature.” Babies born before 28 weeks of pregnancy are considered extremely preterm. The earlier a baby is born, the less likely he or she is to survive. Those who do survive often have serious, sometimes long-term, health problems and disabilities.


FAQ119, July 2019

Is it safe to exercise during pregnancy? If you are healthy and your pregnancy is normal, it is safe to continue or start regular physical activity. Physical activity does not increase your risk of miscarriage, low birth weight, or early delivery. However, it is important to discuss exercise with your obstetrician or other member of your health care team during your early prenatal visits. If your health care professional gives you the OK to exercise, you can discuss what activities you can do safely.


FAQ105, July 2019

What is group B streptococcus? Group B streptococcus (GBS) is one of the many bacteria that live in the body. It usually does not cause serious illness, and it is not a sexually transmitted infection (STI). Also, although the names are similar, GBS is different from group A streptococcus, the bacteria that causes “strep throat.”


FAQ176, July 2019

What is diabetes mellitus? Diabetes mellitus (also called “diabetes”) is caused by a problem with insulin. Insulin moves glucose out of the blood and into the body’s cells where it can be turned into energy (see the FAQ Diabetes and Women). Pregnancy health care professionals often call diabetes that is present before pregnancy pregestational diabetes mellitus. When the body does not make enough insulin or does not respond to it, glucose cannot get into cells and instead stays in the blood. As a result, the level of glucose in the blood increases. Over time, high blood glucose levels can dam...


FAQ055, June 2019


9.
June 2019

FAQ128, June 2019

What is thyroid disease? The thyroid gland is located at the base of your neck in front of your trachea (or windpipe). The thyroid gland makes, stores, and releases two hormones—T4 (thyroxine) and T3 (triiodothyronine). Certain disorders can cause the thyroid gland to make too much or too little hormone. Women at risk of thyroid disease include those who have or have had an autoimmune disease (such as diabetes mellitus).


FAQ098, May 2019

Why may special tests be needed during pregnancy? Special testing during pregnancy most often is done when there is an increased risk of pregnancy complications or stillbirth. This can occur in the following situations: High-risk pregnancy (a woman has had complications in a previous pregnancy or has a pre-existing health condition such as diabetes mellitus or heart disease) Problems during pregnancy, such as fetal growth problems, Rh sensitization, or high blood pressure Decreased movement of the fetus Pregnancy that goes past 42 weeks (postterm pregnancy) Multiple pregnancy with certa...


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