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FAQ119, July 2019

Is it safe to exercise during pregnancy? If you are healthy and your pregnancy is normal, it is safe to continue or start regular physical activity. Physical activity does not increase your risk of miscarriage, low birth weight, or early delivery. However, it is important to discuss exercise with your obstetrician or other member of your health care team during your early prenatal visits. If your health care professional gives you the OK to exercise, you can discuss what activities you can do safely.


12.
November 2017

FAQ177, November 2017

What is gestational diabetes (GD)? Diabetes mellitus (also called “diabetes”) is a condition in which too much glucose (sugar) stays in the blood instead of being used for energy. Health problems can occur when blood sugar is too high. Some women develop diabetes for the first time during pregnancy. This condition is called gestational diabetes (GD). Women with GD need special care both during and after pregnancy.


FAQ056, April 2017

The information on this page has been replaced with FAQ 056, "Good Health Before Pregnancy: Prepregnancy Care."


FAQ056, October 2018

What is a prepregnancy care checkup? The goal of this checkup is to find things that could affect your pregnancy. Identifying these factors before pregnancy allows you to take steps that can increase the chances of having a healthy pregnancy and a healthy baby. During this visit, your health care professional will ask about your diet and lifestyle, your medical and family history, medications you take, and any past pregnancies


TFAQ004, June 2019

Especially For Teens What does transgender mean? What steps do people take to express gender? I have questions about my gender. Who can I talk to? How can a doctor help me? What options do I have for transitioning? Whose permission do I need for a medical transition? How do puberty blockers work? How does hormone treatment work? What are the risks of puberty blockers and hormone treatment? What are the benefits of puberty blockers and hormone treatment? Is surgery an option for me? Do I need to keep seeing a doctor after a medical transition? ...


16.
November 2013

FAQ130, November 2013

Why is it important to eat a healthy diet? Your body needs a balanced supply of nutrients to grow, replace worn-out tissue, and provide energy. Not getting enough of these important nutrients can affect your health. However, eating too much food and excess calories can lead to health problems.


17.
March 2016

FAQ122, March 2016

What is cardiovascular disease (CVD)? Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death in both men and women in the United States. CVD is a general term for diseases that affect the heart and blood vessels. Many are caused by the buildup of a waxy substance called plaque in the arteries. Plaque can narrow and harden the arteries, a condition called atherosclerosis. It can take several decades for atherosclerosis to develop.


18.
October 2018

FAQ123, October 2018

What is blood pressure? Blood pressure is the force of blood pushing against the walls of the blood vessels called arteries. The arteries carry blood from your heart to your lungs, where the blood picks up oxygen, which is delivered to your organs and tissues. The organs and tissues use the oxygen to power their activities. Other blood vessels called veins bring the now oxygen-poor blood and waste products back to the heart and lungs.


19.
February 2018

FAQ001, February 2018

How can I plan healthy meals during pregnancy? The United States Department of Agriculture has made it easier to plan meals during pregnancy by creating www.choosemyplate.gov. This website helps everyone from dieters and children to pregnant women learn how to make healthy food choices at each mealtime.


20.
April 2016

FAQ182, April 2016

Being overweight is defined as having a body mass index (BMI) of 25–29.9. Obesity is defined as having a BMI of 30 or greater. Within the general category of obesity, there are three levels that reflect the increasing health risks that go along with increasing BMI: • Lowest risk is a BMI of 30–34.9. • Medium risk is a BMI of 35.0–39.9. • Highest risk is a BMI of 40 or greater.


American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists
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Mailing Address: PO Box 96920, Washington, DC 20024-9998