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41.
August 2011

FAQ128, August 2011

What is thyroid disease? The thyroid gland is located at the base of your neck in front of your trachea (or windpipe). The thyroid gland makes, stores, and releases two hormones—T4 (thyroxine) and T3 (triiodothyronine). Certain disorders can cause the thyroid gland to make too much or too little hormone. Women at risk of thyroid disease include those who have or have had an autoimmune disease (such as diabetes).


42.
November 2014

FAQ139, November 2014

What is accidental bowel leakage? Accidental bowel leakage is loss of normal control of your bowels. It also is called fecal incontinence. This condition leads to leakage of solid or liquid stool (feces) or gas.


PFSI011 Mosquito Bite Prevention If you must travel to one of the areas where Zika virus is spreading, strictly follow these four steps to prevent mosquito bites:  Use EPA-registered bug spray with DEET, picaridin, IR3535, oil of lemon eucalyptus, paramenthane-diol, or 2-undecanone. Used as directed, these sprays are safe for pregnant and breastfeeding women.  Wear long-sleeved shirts and long pants.  Treat clothing and gear with permethrin or buy permethrin-treated items.  Stay in air-conditioned or screened-in areas during the day and at night. Follow these steps at all ...


Pregnancy Periods Sexuality and Relationships 10. Have safe and healthy relationships with a boyfriend or girlfriend. 11. Know when a relationship is threatening or harmful. 12. Talk about lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) topics. 13. Think things through before you have sex for the first time. 14. Learn about safe sex. 15. Get birth control so you can choose to become pregnant when the time is right for you. 16. Plan ahead for a safe and healthy pregnancy. 17. Get tested for pregnancy. 18. Know what your options are if you become pregnant. 19. Protect yourself fr...


FAQ098, November 2013

Why may special tests be needed during pregnancy? Special testing during pregnancy most often is done when the fetus is at increased risk of problems that could result in pregnancy complications or lead to stillbirth. This can occur in the following situations: High-risk pregnancy (a woman has had complications in a previous pregnancy or has a preexisting health condition such as diabetes or heart disease) Problems during pregnancy, such as fetal growth problems, Rh sensitization, or high blood pressure Decreased movement of the fetus Pregnancy that goes past 42 weeks (postterm pregnancy...


46.
June 2016

FAQ193, June 2016

How common is heavy menstrual bleeding? Heavy menstrual bleeding is very common. About one third of women seek treatment for it. Heavy menstrual bleeding is not normal. It can disrupt your life and may be a sign of a more serious health problem. If you are worried that your menstrual bleeding is too heavy, tell your obstetrician–gynecologist (ob-gyn).


47.
September 2017

FAQ085, September 2017

What is cervical cancer screening? Cervical cancer screening is used to find changes in the cells of the cervix that could lead to cancer. The cervix is the opening to the uterus and is located at the top of the vagina. Screening includes cervical cytology (also called the Pap test or Pap smear) and, for some women, testing for human papillomavirus (HPV).


PFS004, September 2013

Cervical cancer screening can find changes in the cells of the cervix that could lead to cancer. Screening includes the Pap test and, for some women, testing for human papillomavirus (HPV). A Pap test used to be recommended for most women every year. However, this recommendation has changed recently. Most women do not need to have cervical cancer screening each year.


49.
March 2015

FAQ008, March 2015

What is a hysterectomy? Hysterectomy is surgery to remove the uterus. It is a very common type of surgery for women in the United States. Removing your uterus means that you can no longer become pregnant.


FAQ119, July 2017

Is it safe to exercise during pregnancy? If you are healthy and your pregnancy is normal, it is safe to continue or start most types of exercise, but you may need to make a few changes. Physical activity does not increase your risk of miscarriage, low birth weight, or early delivery. However, it is important to discuss exercise with your obstetrician or other member of your health care team during your early prenatal visits. If your health care professional gives you the OK to exercise, you can decide together on an exercise routine that fits your needs and is safe during pregnancy.


American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists
409 12th Street SW, Washington, DC  20024-2188 | Mailing Address: PO Box 70620, Washington, DC 20024-9998