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FAQ126, December 2015

How common is nausea and vomiting of pregnancy? Nausea and vomiting of pregnancy is a very common condition. Although nausea and vomiting of pregnancy often is called “morning sickness,” it can occur at any time of the day. Nausea and vomiting of pregnancy usually is not harmful to the developing baby, but it can have a serious effect on your life, including your ability to work or do your normal daily activities.


FAQ001, April 2015

How can I plan healthy meals during pregnancy? Planning healthy meals during pregnancy is not hard. The United States Department of Agriculture has made it easier by creating www.choosemyplate.gov. This web site helps everyone from dieters and children to pregnant women learn how to make healthy food choices at each mealtime.


FAQ168, February 2013

What are my options if I find out that I am pregnant? There are three options available to you if you discover you are pregnant: 1) you can give birth to the baby and raise the baby, 2) you can give birth to the baby and place the baby for adoption; 3) you can end the pregnancy by having an abortion.


FAQ169, June 2014

What are some of the common skin changes that occur during pregnancy? Many women notice changes to their skin, nails, and hair during pregnancy. Some of the most common changes include the following: Dark spots on the breasts, nipples, or inner thighs Melasma—brown patches on the face around the cheeks, nose, and forehead Linea nigra—a dark line that runs from the navel to the pubic hair Stretch marks Acne Spider veins Varicose veins Changes in nail and hair growth


5.
February 2016

FAQ172, February 2016

What is cord blood? Cord blood is the blood from the baby that is left in the umbilical cord and placenta after birth. It contains special cells called hematopoietic stem cells that can be used to treat some types of diseases.


FAQ173, June 2016

When is a baby considered “preterm” or “extremely preterm?” A normal pregnancy with one baby lasts about 40 weeks. Babies born before 37 completed weeks of pregnancy are called “preterm” or “premature.” Babies born before 28 completed weeks of pregnancy are considered extremely preterm. The earlier a baby is born, the less likely he or she is to survive. Those who do survive often have serious, sometimes long-term health problems and disabilities.


FAQ176, December 2011

What is diabetes mellitus? Diabetes mellitus (also called "diabetes") is caused by a problem with insulin. Insulin moves glucose out of the blood and into the body's cells where it can be turned into energy (see the FAQ Diabetes and Women). Pregnancy health care providers often call diabetes that is present before pregnancy "pregestational diabetes."


8.
September 2013

FAQ177, September 2013

What is gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes is diabetes mellitus that develops in women for the first time during pregnancy. Some women found to have gestational diabetes actually may have had mild diabetes before pregnancy that was not diagnosed.


9.
April 2016

FAQ182, April 2016

Being overweight is defined as having a body mass index (BMI) of 25–29.9. Obesity is defined as having a BMI of 30 or greater. Within the general category of obesity, there are three levels that reflect the increasing health risks that go along with increasing BMI: • Lowest risk is a BMI of 30–34.9. • Medium risk is a BMI of 35.0–39.9. • Highest risk is a BMI of 40 or greater.


10.
July 2015

FAQ188, July 2015

How does multiple pregnancy occur? A twin, triplet, or higher-order pregnancy (four or more babies) is called multiple pregnancy. If more than one egg is released during the menstrual cycle and each is fertilized by a sperm, more than one embryo may implant and grow in your uterus. This type of pregnancy results in fraternal twins (or more). When a single fertilized egg splits, it results in multiple identical embryos. This type of pregnancy results in identical twins (or more). Identical twins are less common than fraternal twins.


American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists
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