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FAQ087, November 2016

What is preterm labor? Preterm labor is defined as regular contractions of the uterus resulting in changes in the cervix that start before 37 weeks of pregnancy. Changes in the cervix include effacement (the cervix thins out) and dilation (the cervix opens so that the fetus can enter the birth canal).


FAQ045, November 2016

What are the benefits of physical activity? Physical activity benefits your body in many ways. Being active strengthens your muscles; increases your flexibility; gives you more energy; helps control your weight; helps build and maintain strong bones; helps prevent or reduce the risk of major diseases, such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes mellitus, and certain types of cancer; relieves stress, improves sleep quality, and can help ease depression and anxiety


23.
November 2016

FAQ029, November 2016

How long should I breastfeed my baby? Exclusive breastfeeding is recommended for the first 6 months of a baby’s life. Breastfeeding should continue up to the baby’s first birthday as new foods are introduced. You can keep breastfeeding after the baby’s first birthday for as long as you and your baby would like.


PFSI011 Mosquito Bite Prevention If you must travel to one of the areas where Zika virus is spreading, strictly follow these four steps to prevent mosquito bites:  Use EPA-registered bug spray with DEET, picaridin, IR3535, oil of lemon eucalyptus, paramenthane-diol, or 2-undecanone. Used as directed, these sprays are safe for pregnant and breastfeeding women.  Wear long-sleeved shirts and long pants.  Treat clothing and gear with permethrin or buy permethrin-treated items.  Stay in air-conditioned or screened-in areas during the day and at night. Follow these steps at all ...


PFSI010 ››› Weeks 1–4 Weeks 5–8 Weeks 9–12 Weeks 13–16 Weeks 17–20 Weeks 21–24 • Timing: 10–13 weeks • Blood test plus NT ultrasound exam • Screens for Down • syndrome and trisomy 18 First-trimester screening Second-trimester screening (“quad screen”) • Timing: 15–22 weeks • Blood test • Screens for Down syndrome, trisomy 13, trisomy 18, and NTDs Standard ultrasound exam • Timing: 18–22 weeks • Screens for some physical defects Integrated screening and sequential screening • Timing: 10–22 weeks • Combines first-trimester and second-trimester screening test results in vari...


FAQ164, September 2016

What is prenatal genetic testing? Prenatal genetic testing gives parents-to-be information about whether their fetus has certain genetic disorders.


27.
September 2016

FAQ054, September 2016

What is genital herpes? Genital herpes is a sexually transmitted infection (STI). It is caused by a virus called herpes simplex virus (HSV). Infection with HSV can cause painful sores and blisters around the lips, genitals, or anus. Sometimes, infection with HSV causes no sores. It is possible to have HSV and not know it. There is no cure, but the infection can be managed.


FAQ038, July 2016

Does bleeding during pregnancy always mean that there is a problem? Vaginal bleeding during pregnancy has many causes. Some are serious, whereas others are not. Bleeding can occur early or later in pregnancy. Bleeding in early pregnancy is common. In many cases, it does not signal a major problem. Bleeding later in pregnancy can be more serious. It is best to contact your obstetrician–gynecologist (ob-gyn) or other health care professional if you have any bleeding at any time during pregnancy.


29.
June 2016

FAQ173, June 2016

When is a baby considered “preterm” or “extremely preterm?” A normal pregnancy with one baby lasts about 40 weeks. Babies born before 37 completed weeks of pregnancy are called “preterm” or “premature.” Babies born before 28 completed weeks of pregnancy are considered extremely preterm. The earlier a baby is born, the less likely he or she is to survive. Those who do survive often have serious, sometimes long-term health problems and disabilities.


30.
June 2016

TFAQ002, June 2016

How can the media make me feel bad about my body? Images of what the media believes are “ideal” women are everywhere—on TV, in movies, online, in magazines, in ads, and in video games. You may begin to believe that these images show what is normal. But the weights and body types of women you see in the media are not normal. Only about 5% of American women have the genetics to make it possible to look like these images. For most people, trying to look like these images can be unhealthy. It can cause depression, eating disorders, and low self-esteem. It’s hard not to compare how you look ...


American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists
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