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141.
August 2011

FAQ080, August 2011

What is the difference between outpatient surgery and inpatient surgery? Outpatient surgery, also called ambulatory or same–day surgery, does not require an overnight stay in the hospital, meaning that you can go home the same day if your condition is stable. You will need someone to drive you home. Outpatient surgery may be done in a hospital, health care provider's office, surgical center, or clinic. Inpatient surgery takes place in a hospital and requires an overnight stay.


142.
August 2011

FAQ048, August 2011

What is osteoporosis? Osteoporosis is a condition in which bones become thin, brittle, and weak.


FAQ174, August 2011

What is deep vein thrombosis (DVT)? Deep vein thrombosis is a condition in which blood clots (or thrombi) form in deep veins in the legs or other areas of the body. Veins are the blood vessels that carry blood from the body's tissues to the heart. Deep veins are located deep in the body, away from the skin's surface.


144.
August 2011

FAQ099, August 2011

What is chronic pelvic pain? Chronic pelvic pain is pain in the pelvic area that lasts for 6 months or longer. Chronic pain can come and go, or it can be constant. Sometimes chronic pelvic pain follows a regular cycle. For example, it may occur during menstruation. It also can occur only at certain times, such as before or after eating, while urinating, or during sex.


145.
August 2011

FAQ143, August 2011

What is hysterosalpingography (HSG)? Hysterosalpingography (HSG) is an X-ray procedure that is used to view the inside of the uterus and fallopian tubes. It often is used to see if the fallopian tubes are partly or fully blocked. It also can show if the inside of the uterus is of a normal size and shape. All of these problems can lead to infertility and pregnancy problems. HSG also is used a few months after some tubal sterilization procedures to make sure that the fallopian tubes have been completely blocked. HSG is not done if a woman has any of the following conditions: Pregnancy, Pelvi...


146.
August 2011

FAQ128, August 2011

What is thyroid disease? The thyroid gland is located at the base of your neck in front of your trachea (or windpipe). The thyroid gland makes, stores, and releases two hormones—T4 (thyroxine) and T3 (triiodothyronine). Certain disorders can cause the thyroid gland to make too much or too little hormone. Women at risk of thyroid disease include those who have or have had an autoimmune disease (such as diabetes).


FAQ162, May 2011

What are menopause and perimenopause? Menopause is defined as the absence of menstrual periods for 1 year. The average age of menopause is 51 years, but the normal range is 45 years to 55 years. The years leading up to this point are called perimenopause. This term means "around menopause." This phase can last for up to 10 years. During perimenopause, shifts in hormone levels can affect ovulation and cause changes in the menstrual cycle.


FAQ004, May 2011

What happens when labor begins? As labor begins, the cervix opens (dilates). The uterus, which contains muscle, contracts at regular intervals. When it contracts, the abdomen becomes hard. Between the contractions, the uterus relaxes and becomes soft. Up to the start of labor and during early labor, the baby will continue to move.


149.
May 2011

FAQ074, May 2011

What are uterine fibroids? Uterine fibroids are benign (not cancer) growths that develop from the muscle tissue of the uterus. They also are called leiomyomas or myomas. The size, shape, and location of fibroids can vary greatly. They may be present inside the uterus, on its outer surface or within its wall, or attached to it by a stem-like structure. A woman may have only one fibroid or many of varying sizes. A fibroid may remain very small for a long time and suddenly grow rapidly, or grow slowly over a number of years.


American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists
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