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Practice Bulletin Number 145, July 2014

(Replaces Practice Bulletin Number 9, October 1999) (Reaffirmed 2019)

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2.
December 2016

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Committee Opinion Number 703, June 2017

ABSTRACT: Asymptomatic microscopic hematuria is an important clinical sign of urinary tract malignancy. Asymptomatic microscopic hematuria has been variably defined over the years. In addition, the evidence primarily is based on data from male patients. However, whether the patient is a man or a woman influences the differential diagnosis of asymptomatic microscopic hematuria, and the risk of urinary tract malignancy (bladder, ureter, and kidney) is significantly less in women than in men. Among women, being older than 60 years, having a history of smoking, and having gross hematuria are the ...


Committee Opinion Number 496, August 2011

(Reaffirmed 2019)

ABSTRACT: Compared with men, at-risk alcohol use by women has a disproportionate effect on their health and lives, including reproductive function and pregnancy outcomes. Obstetrician–gynecologists have a key role in screening and providing brief intervention, patient education, and treatment referral for their patients who drink alcohol at risk levels. For women who are not physically addicted to alcohol, tools such as brief intervention and motivational interviewing can be used effectively by the clinician and incorporated into an office visit. For pregnant women and those at risk of pregna...


Committee Opinion Number 278, November 2002

Reaffirmed 2019

ABSTRACT: Clinically significant false-positive human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) test results are rare. However, some individuals have circulating factors in their serum (eg, heterophilic antibodies or nonactive forms of hCG) that interact with the hCG antibody and cause unusual or unexpected test results. False-positive and false-negative test results can occur with any specimen, and caution should be exercised when clinical findings and laboratory results are discordant. Methods to rule out the presence of interfering substances include using a urine test, rerunning the assay with serial ...


Committee Opinion Number 691, March 2017

(Replaces Committee Opinion Number 318, October 2005;
Committee Opinion Number 432, May 2009;
Committee Opinion Number 442, October 2009;
Committee Opinion Number 469, October 2010;
Committee Opinion Number 486, April 2011)

(Reaffirmed 2019)

ABSTRACT: Carrier screening is a term used to describe genetic testing that is performed on an individual who does not have any overt phenotype for a genetic disorder but may have one variant allele within a gene(s) associated with a diagnosis. Information about carrier screening should be provided to every pregnant woman. Carrier screening and counseling ideally should be performed before pregnancy because this enables couples to learn about their reproductive risk and consider the most complete range of reproductive options. A patient may decline any or all screening. When an individual is ...


Committee Opinion Number 690, March 2017

(Reaffirmed 2019)

ABSTRACT: Carrier screening, whether targeted or expanded, allows individuals to consider their range of reproductive options. Ultimately, the goal of genetic screening is to provide individuals with meaningful information that they can use to guide pregnancy planning based on their personal values. Ethnic-specific, panethnic, and expanded carrier screening are acceptable strategies for prepregnancy and prenatal carrier screening. Because all of these are acceptable strategies, each obstetrician–gynecologist or other health care provider or practice should establish a standard approach that i...


Committee Opinion Number 727, January 2018

ABSTRACT: “Cascade testing” refers to the performance of genetic counseling and testing in blood relatives of individuals who have been identified with specific genetic mutations. Testing protocols and other interventions may save lives and improve health and quality of life for these family members. Obstetrician–gynecologists should know who is eligible for cascade testing and should use all available resources to ensure that cascade testing is offered and occurs in a timely manner. Despite the clear health benefits for specific populations and individuals, obstetrician–gynecologists should ...


Practice Bulletin Number 168, October 2016

(Replaces Practice Bulletin Number 157, January 2016) (Reaffirmed 2018)

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Practice Bulletin Number 203, January 2019

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Committee Opinion Number 678, November 2016

(Reaffirmed 2018)

ABSTRACT: Current sexuality education programs vary widely in the accuracy of content, emphasis, and effectiveness. Data have shown that not all programs are equally effective for all ages, races and ethnicities, socioeconomic groups, and geographic areas. Studies have demonstrated that comprehensive sexuality education programs reduce the rates of sexual activity, sexual risk behaviors (eg, number of partners and unprotected intercourse), sexually transmitted infections, and adolescent pregnancy. One key component of an effective program is encouraging community-centered efforts. In addition...


Committee Opinion Number 693, April 2017

(Reaffirmed 2019)

ABSTRACT: Given the increasing availability and complexity of genetic testing, it is imperative that the practicing obstetrician–gynecologist or other health care provider has a firm comprehension of the benefits, limitations, and risks of offering a specific genetic test, as well as the importance of appropriate pretest and posttest counseling. The purpose of this Committee Opinion is to provide an outline of how obstetrician–gynecologists and other health care providers can best incorporate these tests into their current practices and provide appropriate pretest and posttest counseling to p...


Practice Bulletin Number 164, June 2016

(Reaffirmed 2018)

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Committee Opinion Number 780, June 2019

ABSTRACT: At puberty, a patient with an imperforate hymen typically presents with a vaginal bulge of thin hymenal tissue with a dark or bluish hue caused by the hematocolpos behind it. Other findings that may be present include an abdominal mass, urinary retention, dysuria, constipation, and dyschezia. On evaluation, the goal is to differentiate an imperforate hymen from other obstructing anatomic etiologies, such as labial adhesions, urogenital sinus, transverse vaginal septum, or distal vaginal atresia. Surgical intervention is necessary only in symptomatic prepubertal patients. After confi...


Practice Bulletin Number 128, July 2012

(Reaffirmed 2016)

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Committee Opinion Number 645, November 2015

(Reaffirmed 2018)

ABSTRACT: Gonorrhea is the second most commonly reported bacterial sexually transmitted disease in the United States, with an estimated 820,000 new Neisseria gonorrhoeae infections occurring each year. Antimicrobial resistance limits treatment success, heightens the risk of complications, and may facilitate the transmission of sexually transmitted infections. Neisseria gonorrhoeae has developed resistance to the sulfonamides, the tetracyclines, and penicillin. Dual therapy with ceftriaxone and azithromycin remains the only recommended first-line regimen for the treatment of gonorrhea in the U...


Committee Opinion Number 760, December 2018

ABSTRACT: Dysmenorrhea, or menstrual pain, is the most common menstrual symptom among adolescent girls and young women. Most adolescents experiencing dysmenorrhea have primary dysmenorrhea, defined as painful menstruation in the absence of pelvic pathology. When the patient’s history suggests primary dysmenorrhea, empiric treatment should be initiated. When a patient does not experience clinical improvement for her dysmenorrhea within 3–6 months of therapy initiation, her obstetrician–gynecologist should investigate for possible secondary causes and for treatment adherence. Secondary dysmenor...


18.
November 2018

Practice Bulletin Number 200, November 2018

(Replaces Practice Bulletin Number 150, May 2015)

Early pregnancy loss, or loss of an intrauterine pregnancy within the first trimester, is encountered commonly in clinical practice. Obstetricians and gynecologists should understand the use of various diagnostic tools to differentiate between viable and nonviable pregnancies and offer the full range of therapeutic options to patients, including expectant, medical, and surgical management. The purpose of this Practice Bulletin is to review diagnostic approaches and describe options for the management of early pregnancy loss.


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