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Committee Opinion Number 782, June 2019

(Replaces No. 485, April 2011)

ABSTRACT: Group B streptococcus (GBS) is the leading cause of newborn infection (1). The primary risk factor for neonatal GBS early-onset disease (EOD) is maternal colonization of the genitourinary and gastrointestinal tracts. Approximately 50% of women who are colonized with GBS will transmit the bacteria to their newborns. Vertical transmission usually occurs during labor or after rupture of membranes. In the absence of intrapartum antibiotic prophylaxis, 1 – 2% of those newborns will develop GBS EOD. Other risk factors include gestational age of less than 37 weeks, very low birth weight, p...


Practice Bulletin Number 213, June 2019

(Replaces Practice Bulletin Number 119, April 2011)

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Committee Opinion Number 776, April 2019

ABSTRACT: Because autoimmune conditions occur more often among women of childbearing age, continuation of these medications during pregnancy is often considered to optimize disease management in the woman and pregnancy outcomes, without placing the fetus at undue risk. Many commonly prescribed drugs can be used safely during pregnancy without risk of teratogenicity or pregnancy complications, whereas a few are strictly contraindicated. The decision to use any agent during pregnancy should be based on the clinical context, risks associated with individual medications, and gestational age. For ...


Committee Opinion Number 775, April 2019

(Replaces Committee Opinion No. 696, April 2017)

ABSTRACT: The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists' Committee on Obstetric Practice acknowledges that the issue of nonobstetric surgery during pregnancy is an important concern for physicians who care for women. Because of the difficulty of conducting large-scale randomized clinical trials in this population, there are no data to allow for specific recommendations. It is important for a physician to obtain an obstetric consultation before performing nonobstetric surgery and some invasive procedures (eg, cardiac catheterization or colonoscopy) because obstetricians are uniquely ...


5.
April 2019

Practice Bulletin Number 210, April 2019

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Committee Opinion Number 772, March 2019

(Replaces Committee Opinion Number 661, April 2016)

ABSTRACT: Immunization against vaccine-preventable diseases is an essential component of women’s primary and preventive health care. Many studies have shown that a recommendation from an obstetrician–gynecologist or other health care provider for a vaccine is one of the strongest influences on patient acceptance. Obstetrician–gynecologists and other health care providers should develop a standard process for assessing and documenting the vaccination status of patients and for recommending and administering vaccines. If allowed by state law, obstetrician–gynecologists and other health care pro...


Practice Bulletin Number 207, March 2019

(Replaces Practice Bulletin Number 166, September 2016)

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Committee Opinion Number 767, February 2019

(Replaces Committee Opinion Number 692, September 2017)

ABSTRACT: Acute-onset, severe systolic hypertension; severe diastolic hypertension; or both can occur during the prenatal, intrapartum, or postpartum periods. Pregnant women or women in the postpartum period with acute-onset, severe systolic hypertension; severe diastolic hypertension; or both require urgent antihypertensive therapy. Introducing standardized, evidence-based clinical guidelines for the management of patients with preeclampsia and eclampsia has been demonstrated to reduce the incidence of adverse maternal outcomes. Individuals and institutions should have mechanisms in place to...


Practice Bulletin Number 206, February 2019

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Practice Bulletin Number 203, January 2019

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Practice Bulletin Number 202, January 2019

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Practice Bulletin Number 201, December 2018

(Replaces Practice Bulletin Number 60, March 2005)

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13.
November 2018

Practice Bulletin Number 200, November 2018

(Replaces Practice Bulletin Number 150, May 2015)

Early pregnancy loss, or loss of an intrauterine pregnancy within the first trimester, is encountered commonly in clinical practice. Obstetricians and gynecologists should understand the use of various diagnostic tools to differentiate between viable and nonviable pregnancies and offer the full range of therapeutic options to patients, including expectant, medical, and surgical management. The purpose of this Practice Bulletin is to review diagnostic approaches and describe options for the management of early pregnancy loss.


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Committee Opinion Number 753, October 2018

ABSTRACT: Pregnant and postpartum women are at high risk of serious complications of seasonal and pandemic influenza infection. Pregnancy itself is a high-risk condition, making the potential adverse effects of influenza particularly serious in pregnant women. If a pregnant woman has other underlying health conditions, the risk of adverse effects from influenza is even greater. Antiviral treatment is necessary for all pregnant women with suspected or confirmed influenza, regardless of vaccination status. Obstetrician–gynecologists and other obstetric care providers should promptly recognize t...


Practice Bulletin Number 199, September 2018

(Replaces Practice Bulletin Number 120, June 2011)

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Committee Opinion Number 747, August 2018

(Replaces Committee Opinion Number 607, August 2014)

ABSTRACT: The diagnosis of cancer in females younger than 20 years is rare, with the incidence of 17 cases per 100,000 individuals per year in the United States. Although advancements in cancer therapy have dramatically improved childhood cancer survival, gynecologists should be aware of the increased risk of adverse reproductive health effects from each type of therapy. Cancer and its treatment may have immediate or delayed adverse effects on reproductive health. Gynecologists may be consulted for the following issues: pubertal concerns; menstrual irregularities; heavy menstrual bleeding and...


Committee Opinion Number 743, July 2018

ABSTRACT: Low-dose aspirin has been used during pregnancy, most commonly to prevent or delay the onset of preeclampsia. The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists issued the Hypertension in Pregnancy Task Force Report recommending daily low-dose aspirin beginning in the late first trimester for women with a history of early-onset preeclampsia and preterm delivery at less than 34 0/7 weeks of gestation, or for women with more than one prior pregnancy complicated by preeclampsia. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force published a similar guideline, although the list of indications...


Practice Bulletin Number 197, July 2018

(Replaces Practice Bulletin Number 138, September 2013)

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Committee Opinion Number 742, July 2018

ABSTRACT: Pain and fatigue are the most common problems reported by women in the early postpartum period. Pain can interfere with a woman’s ability to care for herself and her infant. Untreated pain is associated with a risk of greater opioid use, postpartum depression, and development of persistent pain. Nonpharmacologic and pharmacologic therapies are important components of postpartum pain management. Because 81% of women in the United States initiate breastfeeding during the postpartum period, it is important to consider the drug effects of all prescribed medications on the mother–infant ...


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