Search Results

Results 61–68 of 68
Sort By: Relevance| Date| Title

Practice Bulletin Number 116, November 2010

Reaffirmed 2019

Members Only


Committee Opinion Number 455, March 2010

(Reaffirmed 2018)

Abstract: Numerous large clinical studies have evaluated the evidence regarding magnesium sulfate, neuroprotection, and preterm births. The Committee on Obstetric Practice and the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine recognize that none of the individual studies found a benefit with regard to their primary outcome. However, the available evidence suggests that magnesium sulfate given before anticipated early preterm birth reduces the risk of cerebral palsy in surviving infants. Physicians electing to use magnesium sulfate for fetal neuroprotection should develop specific guidelines regarding i...


63.
August 2009

Practice Bulletin Number 107, August 2009

Replaces Practice Bulletin Number 10, November 1999; Committee Opinion Number 228, November 1999; Committee Opinion Number 248, December 2000; Committee Opinion Number 283, May 2003 (Reaffirmed 2019)

Members Only


Practice Bulletin Number 106, July 2009

Replaces Practice Bulletin Number 70, December 2005. Reaffirmed 2019

Members Only


Practice Bulletin Number 82, June 2007

(Replaces Practice Bulletin Number 8, October 1999) (Reaffirmed 2018)

Members Only


Committee Opinion Number 346, October 2006

(Reaffirmed 2018)

ABSTRACT: Amnioinfusion has been advocated as a technique to reduce the incidence of meconium aspiration and to improve neonatal outcome. However, a large proportion of women with meconium-stained amniotic fluid have infants who have taken in meconium within the trachea or bronchioles before meconium passage has been noted and before amnioinfusion can be performed by the obstetrician; meconium passage may predate labor. Based on current literature, routine prophylactic amnioinfusion for the dilution of meconium-stained amniotic fluid is not recommended. Prophylactic use of amnioinfusion for m...


Committee Opinion Number 275, September 2002

(Replaces No. 121, April 1993, Reaffirmed 2019)

ABSTRACT: Effective rehabilitation and modern reproductive technology may increase the number of women considering pregnancy who have spinal cord injuries (SCIs). It is important that obstetricians caring for these patients are aware of the specific problems related to SCIs. Autonomic dysreflexia is the most significant medical complication seen in women with SCIs, and precautions should be taken to avoid stimuli that can lead to this potentially fatal syndrome. Women with SCIs may give birth vaginally, but when cesarean delivery is indicated, adequate anesthesia (spinal or epidural if possib...


Committee Opinion Number 205, August 1998

Tubal ligation at the time of cesarean delivery requires significant additional physician work even though the technical work of the procedure is brief. Informed consent by the patient requires considerably more counseling by the physician regarding potential risks and benefits of this procedure than is necessary with alternative means of sterilization and contraception. Also, many states require completion of special informed consent documents in addition to the customary consent forms required by hospitals. These forms must be completed before scheduling the procedure.


Advertisement

American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists
409 12th Street SW, Washington, DC  20024-2188
Mailing Address: PO Box 96920, Washington, DC 20024-9998