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1.
August 2019

Number 9, August 2019

Replaces Obstetric Care Consensus Number 2, February 2015

ABSTRACT: Maternal mortality and severe maternal morbidity, particularly among women of color, have increased in the United States. The leading medical causes of maternal mortality include cardiovascular disease, infection, and common obstetric complications such as hemorrhage, and vary by timing relative to the end of pregnancy. Although specific modifications in the clinical management of some of these conditions have been instituted, more can be done to improve the system of care for high-risk women at facility and population levels. The goal of levels of maternal care is to reduce materna...


Committee Opinion Number 782, June 2019

(Replaces No. 485, April 2011)

ABSTRACT: Group B streptococcus (GBS) is the leading cause of newborn infection (1). The primary risk factor for neonatal GBS early-onset disease (EOD) is maternal colonization of the genitourinary and gastrointestinal tracts. Approximately 50% of women who are colonized with GBS will transmit the bacteria to their newborns. Vertical transmission usually occurs during labor or after rupture of membranes. In the absence of intrapartum antibiotic prophylaxis, 1 – 2% of those newborns will develop GBS EOD. Other risk factors include gestational age of less than 37 weeks, very low birth weight, p...


Practice Bulletin Number 212, May 2019

Members Only


Practice Bulletin Number 211, May 2019

(Replaces Practice Bulletin Number 170, October 2016)

Members Only


Practice Bulletin Number 209, March 2019

(Replaces Practice Bulletin Number 177, April 2017)

Members Only


Committee Opinion Number 767, February 2019

(Replaces Committee Opinion Number 692, September 2017)

ABSTRACT: Acute-onset, severe systolic hypertension; severe diastolic hypertension; or both can occur during the prenatal, intrapartum, or postpartum periods. Pregnant women or women in the postpartum period with acute-onset, severe systolic hypertension; severe diastolic hypertension; or both require urgent antihypertensive therapy. Introducing standardized, evidence-based clinical guidelines for the management of patients with preeclampsia and eclampsia has been demonstrated to reduce the incidence of adverse maternal outcomes. Individuals and institutions should have mechanisms in place to...


Committee Opinion Number 766, February 2019

(Replaces Committee Opinion No. 687, February 2017)

ABSTRACT: Obstetrician–gynecologists, in collaboration with midwives, nurses, patients, and those who support them in labor, can help women meet their goals for labor and birth by using techniques that require minimal interventions and have high rates of patient satisfaction. Many common obstetric practices are of limited or uncertain benefit for low-risk women in spontaneous labor. For women who are in latent labor and are not admitted to the labor unit, a process of shared decision making is recommended to create a plan for self-care activities and coping techniques. Admission during the la...


Committee Opinion Number 765, February 2019

(Replaces Committee Opinion No. 561, April 2013)

ABSTRACT: There are medical indications in pregnancy for which there is evidence or expert opinion to support delivery versus expectant management in the early-term period. However, the risk of adverse outcomes is greater for neonates delivered in the early-term period compared with neonates delivered at 39 weeks of gestation. In addition to immediate adverse perinatal outcomes, multiple studies have shown increased rates of adverse long-term infant outcomes associated with late-preterm and early-term delivery compared with full-term delivery. A recent systematic review found that late-preter...


Practice Bulletin Number 205, February 2019

(Replaces Practice Bulletin Number 184, August 2010)

Members Only


Committee Opinion Number 764, February 2019

(Replaces Committee Opinion No. 560, April 2013)

ABSTRACT: The neonatal risks of late-preterm and early-term births are well established, and the potential neonatal complications associated with elective delivery at less than 39 0/7 weeks of gestation are well described. However, there are a number of maternal, fetal, and placental complications in which either a late-preterm or early-term delivery is warranted. The timing of delivery in such cases must balance the maternal and newborn risks of late-preterm and early-term delivery with the risks associated with further continuation of pregnancy. Deferring delivery to the 39th week is not re...


Practice Bulletin Number 203, January 2019

Members Only


Committee Opinion Number 761, January 2019

(Replaces Committee Opinion No. 559, April 2013)

Members Only


Practice Bulletin Number 202, January 2019

Members Only


14.
December 2018

Number 7, December 2018

(Replaces Committee Opinion No. 529, July 2012)

ABSTRACT: Placenta accreta spectrum, formerly known as morbidly adherent placenta, refers to the range of pathologic adherence of the placenta, including placenta increta, placenta percreta, and placenta accreta. The most favored hypothesis regarding the etiology of placenta accreta spectrum is that a defect of the endometrial–myometrial interface leads to a failure of normal decidualization in the area of a uterine scar, which allows abnormally deep placental anchoring villi and trophoblast infiltration. Maternal morbidity and mortality can occur because of severe and sometimes life-threaten...


Committee Opinion Number 751, September 2018

(Replaces Committee Opinion No. 234, May 2000)

ABSTRACT: This Committee Opinion is being revised to provide updated guidance on the management of pregnant women during pregnancy and delivery to prevent mother-to-child transmission of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Prevention of transmission of HIV from the woman to her fetus or newborn is a major goal in the care of pregnant women infected with HIV. Continuing research into mother-to-child transmission of HIV has suggested that a substantial number of cases of perinatal HIV transmission occur as the result of fetal exposure to the virus during labor and delivery. The precise mech...


Practice Bulletin Number 199, September 2018

(Replaces Practice Bulletin Number 120, June 2011)

Members Only


Practice Bulletin Number 198, September 2018

(Replaces Practice Bulletin Number 165, June 2011)

Members Only


Committee Opinion Number 745, August 2018

(Replaces Committee Opinion Number 340, July 2006)

ABSTRACT: There is a trend in the United States to perform cesarean delivery for term singleton fetuses in a breech presentation. The number of practitioners with the skills and experience to perform vaginal breech delivery has decreased. The decision regarding the mode of delivery should consider patient wishes and the experience of the health care provider. Obstetrician–gynecologists and other obstetric care providers should offer external cephalic version as an alternative to planned cesarean for a woman who has a term singleton breech fetus, desires a planned vaginal delivery of a vertex-...


19.
March 2018

Committee Opinion Number 731, March 2018

ABSTRACT: Individual prenatal care is intended to prevent poor perinatal outcomes and provide education to women throughout pregnancy, childbirth, and the postpartum period through a series of one-on-one encounters between a woman and her obstetrician or other obstetric care provider. Concerns regarding increasing health care costs, health care provider availability, dissatisfaction with wait times, and the minimal opportunity for education and support associated with the individual care model have given rise to interest in alternative models of prenatal care. One alternative model, group pre...


Practice Bulletin Number 188, January 2018

(Replaces Practice Bulletin Number 172, October 2016)

Members Only


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