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Committee Opinion Number 746, August 2018

(Replaces Committee Opinion Number 443, October 2009)

ABSTRACT: In the absence of obstetric or medical complications, occasional air travel is safe for pregnant women. Pregnant women can fly safely, observing the same precautions for air travel as the general population. Because severe air turbulence cannot be predicted and the subsequent risk for trauma is significant should this occur, pregnant women should be instructed to use their seat belts continuously while seated. Despite a lack of evidence associating lower extremity edema and venous thrombotic events with air travel during pregnancy, certain preventive measures can be used to minimize...


2.
July 2008

Practice Bulletin Number 95, July 2008

Reaffirmed 2019

Members Only


Practice Bulletin Number 145, July 2014

(Replaces Practice Bulletin Number 9, October 1999) (Reaffirmed 2019)

Members Only


4.
December 2012

Practice Bulletin Number 132, December 2012

(Replaces Practice Bulletin Number 118, January 2011). Reaffirmed 2019

Members Only


5.
December 2016

Members Only


Committee Opinion Number 753, October 2018

ABSTRACT: Pregnant and postpartum women are at high risk of serious complications of seasonal and pandemic influenza infection. Pregnancy itself is a high-risk condition, making the potential adverse effects of influenza particularly serious in pregnant women. If a pregnant woman has other underlying health conditions, the risk of adverse effects from influenza is even greater. Antiviral treatment is necessary for all pregnant women with suspected or confirmed influenza, regardless of vaccination status. Obstetrician–gynecologists and other obstetric care providers should promptly recognize t...


7.
February 2008

Practice Bulletin Number 90, February 2008

(Reaffirmed 2019)

Members Only


Committee Opinion Number 496, August 2011

(Reaffirmed 2019)

ABSTRACT: Compared with men, at-risk alcohol use by women has a disproportionate effect on their health and lives, including reproductive function and pregnancy outcomes. Obstetrician–gynecologists have a key role in screening and providing brief intervention, patient education, and treatment referral for their patients who drink alcohol at risk levels. For women who are not physically addicted to alcohol, tools such as brief intervention and motivational interviewing can be used effectively by the clinician and incorporated into an office visit. For pregnant women and those at risk of pregna...


Practice Bulletin Number 105, June 2009

Reaffirmed 2019

Members Only


Committee Opinion Number 691, March 2017

(Replaces Committee Opinion Number 318, October 2005;
Committee Opinion Number 432, May 2009;
Committee Opinion Number 442, October 2009;
Committee Opinion Number 469, October 2010;
Committee Opinion Number 486, April 2011)

(Reaffirmed 2019)

ABSTRACT: Carrier screening is a term used to describe genetic testing that is performed on an individual who does not have any overt phenotype for a genetic disorder but may have one variant allele within a gene(s) associated with a diagnosis. Information about carrier screening should be provided to every pregnant woman. Carrier screening and counseling ideally should be performed before pregnancy because this enables couples to learn about their reproductive risk and consider the most complete range of reproductive options. A patient may decline any or all screening. When an individual is ...


Committee Opinion Number 690, March 2017

(Reaffirmed 2019)

ABSTRACT: Carrier screening, whether targeted or expanded, allows individuals to consider their range of reproductive options. Ultimately, the goal of genetic screening is to provide individuals with meaningful information that they can use to guide pregnancy planning based on their personal values. Ethnic-specific, panethnic, and expanded carrier screening are acceptable strategies for prepregnancy and prenatal carrier screening. Because all of these are acceptable strategies, each obstetrician–gynecologist or other health care provider or practice should establish a standard approach that i...


Practice Bulletin Number 142, February 2014

(Reaffirmed 2019)

Members Only


Practice Bulletin Number 203, January 2019

Members Only


Committee Opinion Number 678, November 2016

(Reaffirmed 2018)

ABSTRACT: Current sexuality education programs vary widely in the accuracy of content, emphasis, and effectiveness. Data have shown that not all programs are equally effective for all ages, races and ethnicities, socioeconomic groups, and geographic areas. Studies have demonstrated that comprehensive sexuality education programs reduce the rates of sexual activity, sexual risk behaviors (eg, number of partners and unprotected intercourse), sexually transmitted infections, and adolescent pregnancy. One key component of an effective program is encouraging community-centered efforts. In addition...


Committee Opinion Number 693, April 2017

(Reaffirmed 2019)

ABSTRACT: Given the increasing availability and complexity of genetic testing, it is imperative that the practicing obstetrician–gynecologist or other health care provider has a firm comprehension of the benefits, limitations, and risks of offering a specific genetic test, as well as the importance of appropriate pretest and posttest counseling. The purpose of this Committee Opinion is to provide an outline of how obstetrician–gynecologists and other health care providers can best incorporate these tests into their current practices and provide appropriate pretest and posttest counseling to p...


Practice Bulletin Number 211, May 2019

(Replaces Practice Bulletin Number 170, October 2016)

Members Only


Practice Bulletin Number 151, June 2015

(Replaces Practice Bulletin Number 20, September 2000). Reaffirmed 2019

Members Only


18.
November 2013

Committee Opinion Number 579, November 2013

(Reaffirmed 2019)

ABSTRACT: In the past, the period from 3 weeks before until 2 weeks after the estimated date of delivery was considered “term,” with the expectation that neonatal outcomes from deliveries in this interval were uniform and good. Increasingly, however, research has shown that neonatal outcomes, especially respiratory morbidity, vary depending on the timing of delivery within this 5-week gestational age range. To address this lack of uniformity, a work group was convened in late 2012, which recommended that the label “term” be replaced with the designations early term (37 0/7 weeks of gestation ...


19.
November 2018

Practice Bulletin Number 200, November 2018

(Replaces Practice Bulletin Number 150, May 2015)

Early pregnancy loss, or loss of an intrauterine pregnancy within the first trimester, is encountered commonly in clinical practice. Obstetricians and gynecologists should understand the use of various diagnostic tools to differentiate between viable and nonviable pregnancies and offer the full range of therapeutic options to patients, including expectant, medical, and surgical management. The purpose of this Practice Bulletin is to review diagnostic approaches and describe options for the management of early pregnancy loss.


Committee Opinion Number 767, February 2019

(Replaces Committee Opinion Number 692, September 2017)

ABSTRACT: Acute-onset, severe systolic hypertension; severe diastolic hypertension; or both can occur during the prenatal, intrapartum, or postpartum periods. Pregnant women or women in the postpartum period with acute-onset, severe systolic hypertension; severe diastolic hypertension; or both require urgent antihypertensive therapy. Introducing standardized, evidence-based clinical guidelines for the management of patients with preeclampsia and eclampsia has been demonstrated to reduce the incidence of adverse maternal outcomes. Individuals and institutions should have mechanisms in place to...


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