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Committee Opinion Number 707, July 2017

(Replaces Committee Opinion Number 542, November 2012)

ABSTRACT: Emergency contraception refers to contraceptive methods used to prevent pregnancy in the first few days after unprotected intercourse, sexual assault, or contraceptive failure. Although the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved the first dedicated product for emergency contraception in 1998, numerous barriers to emergency contraception remain. The purpose of this Committee Opinion is to examine barriers to the use of emergency contraception, emphasize the importance of increasing access, and review new methods of emergency contraception and limitations in efficacy in special po...


Practice Bulletin NUMBER 96, August 2008

Replaces Practice Bulletin Number 16, May 2000 and Committee Opinion Number 293, February 2004 (Reaffirmed 2019)

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3.
July 2008

Practice Bulletin Number 95, July 2008

Reaffirmed 2019

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Committee Opinion Number 713, August 2017

(Replaces Committee Opinion No. 677, October 2016) (Reaffirmed 2018)

ABSTRACT: Corticosteroid administration before anticipated preterm birth is one of the most important antenatal therapies available to improve newborn outcomes. A single course of corticosteroids is recommended for pregnant women between 24 0/7 weeks and 33 6/7 weeks of gestation who are at risk of preterm delivery within 7 days, including for those with ruptured membranes and multiple gestations. It also may be considered for pregnant women starting at 23 0/7 weeks of gestation who are at risk of preterm delivery within 7 days, based on a family’s decision regarding resuscitation, irrespecti...


5.
December 2012

Practice Bulletin Number 132, December 2012

(Replaces Practice Bulletin Number 118, January 2011). Reaffirmed 2019

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6.
December 2016

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Committee Opinion Number 738, June 2018

(Replaces Committee Opinion Number 663, June 2016) (Reaffirmed 2019)

ABSTRACT: Aromatase inhibitors have been used for the treatment of breast cancer, ovulation induction, endometriosis, and other estrogen-modulated conditions. For women with breast cancer, bone mineral density screening is recommended with long-term aromatase inhibitor use because of the risk of osteoporosis due to estrogen deficiency. Based on long-term adverse effects and complication safety data, when compared with tamoxifen, aromatase inhibitors are associated with a reduced incidence of thrombosis, endometrial cancer, and vaginal bleeding. For women with polycystic ovary syndrome, and a...


Committee Opinion Number 753, October 2018

ABSTRACT: Pregnant and postpartum women are at high risk of serious complications of seasonal and pandemic influenza infection. Pregnancy itself is a high-risk condition, making the potential adverse effects of influenza particularly serious in pregnant women. If a pregnant woman has other underlying health conditions, the risk of adverse effects from influenza is even greater. Antiviral treatment is necessary for all pregnant women with suspected or confirmed influenza, regardless of vaccination status. Obstetrician–gynecologists and other obstetric care providers should promptly recognize t...


9.
February 2008

Practice Bulletin Number 90, February 2008

(Reaffirmed 2019)

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Committee Opinion Number 375, August 2007

Reaffirmed 2018

ABSTRACT: The U.S. Food and Drug Administration considers generic and brand name oral contraceptive (OC) products clinically equivalent and interchangeable. The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists supports patient or clinician requests for branded OCs or continuation of the same generic or branded OCs if the request is based on clinical experience or concerns regarding packaging or compliance, or if the branded product is considered a better choice for that individual patient.


Committee Opinion Number 610, October 2014

(Reaffirmed 2019)

ABSTRACT: Surgery can present a management dilemma for gynecologists whose patients receive chronic antithrombotic therapy because the risk of hemorrhagic complications must be balanced against the risk of thromboembolic complications. Interruption of antithrombotic therapy to reduce perioperative bleeding poses a significant risk of recurrent thromboembolic events. Patients who receive chronic antithrombotic therapy should be seen at least 7 days before a planned procedure, and each woman should be included in decision making regarding risks and benefits specific to her situation. The schedu...


Practice Bulletin Number 203, January 2019

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Committee Opinion Number 532, August 2012

(Replaces No. 387, November 2007 and No. 322, November 2005) (Reaffirmed 2018)

ABSTRACT: Although improvement in long-term health is no longer an indication for menopausal hormone therapy, evidence supporting fewer adverse events in younger women, combined with its high overall effectiveness, has reinforced its usefulness for short-term treatment of menopausal symptoms. Menopausal therapy has been provided not only by commercially available products but also by compounding, or creation of an individualized preparation in response to a health care provider’s prescription to create a medication tailored to the specialized needs of an individual patient. The Women’s Health...


Practice Bulletin Number 151, June 2015

(Replaces Practice Bulletin Number 20, September 2000). Reaffirmed 2019

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Practice Bulletin NUMBER 93, May 2008

(Reaffirmed 2019)

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16.
November 2018

Practice Bulletin Number 200, November 2018

(Replaces Practice Bulletin Number 150, May 2015)

Early pregnancy loss, or loss of an intrauterine pregnancy within the first trimester, is encountered commonly in clinical practice. Obstetricians and gynecologists should understand the use of various diagnostic tools to differentiate between viable and nonviable pregnancies and offer the full range of therapeutic options to patients, including expectant, medical, and surgical management. The purpose of this Practice Bulletin is to review diagnostic approaches and describe options for the management of early pregnancy loss.


17.
September 2015

Practice Bulletin Number 152, September 2015

(Replaces Practice Bulletin Number 112, May 2010) (Reaffirmed 2018)

Emergency contraception, also known as postcoital contraception, is therapy used to prevent pregnancy after an unprotected or inadequately protected act of sexual intercourse. Common indications for emergency contraception include contraceptive failure (eg, condom breakage or missed doses of oral contraceptives) and failure to use any form of contraception (1–3). Although oral emergency contraception was first described in the medical literature in the 1960s, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the first dedicated product for emergency contraception in 1998. Since then, sever...


Committee Opinion Number 767, February 2019

(Replaces Committee Opinion Number 692, September 2017)

ABSTRACT: Acute-onset, severe systolic hypertension; severe diastolic hypertension; or both can occur during the prenatal, intrapartum, or postpartum periods. Pregnant women or women in the postpartum period with acute-onset, severe systolic hypertension; severe diastolic hypertension; or both require urgent antihypertensive therapy. Introducing standardized, evidence-based clinical guidelines for the management of patients with preeclampsia and eclampsia has been demonstrated to reduce the incidence of adverse maternal outcomes. Individuals and institutions should have mechanisms in place to...


19.
April 2015

Practice Bulletin Number 149, April 2015

(Replaces Practice Bulletin Number 65, August 2005). Reaffirmed 2019

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