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Committee Opinion Number 510, November 2011

(Replaces No. 341, July 2006) (Reaffirmed 2017)

ABSTRACT: It is ethical for physicians to market their practices provided that the communication is truthful and not misleading, deceptive, or discriminatory. All paid advertising must be clearly identified as such. Producing fair and accurate advertising of medical practices and services can be challenging. It often is difficult to include detailed information because of cost and size restrictions or the limitations of the media form that has been selected. If the specific advertising form does not lend itself to clear and accurate description, an alternative media format should be selected....


22.
August 2007

Committee Opinion Number 374, August 2007

Reaffirmed 2019

ABSTRACT: It is the duty of obstetricians and gynecologists who testify as expert witnesses on behalf of defendants, the government, or plaintiffs to do so solely in accordance with their judgment on the merits of the case. Obstetrician–gynecologists must limit testimony to their sphere of medical expertise and must be prepared adequately. They must make a clear distinction between medical malpractice and medical maloccurrence. The acceptance of fees that are greatly disproportionate to those customary for professional services can be construed as influencing testimony given by the witness, a...


Practice Bulletin Number 213, June 2019

(Replaces Practice Bulletin Number 119, April 2011)

Members Only


Statement of Policy (Approved by the Executive Board July 2012), July 2012

Acknowledging the significant interplay of women's human rights with the overall health of women and society, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists and the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) ardently support efforts to improve the dignity, autonomy, rights and health of women in the United States and globally.


25.
September 2017

Members Only


Members Only


Practice Bulletin Number 167, October 2016

(Replaces Practice Bulletin 117, December 2010, and Committee Opinion 572, September 2013) (Reaffirmed 2019)

In the United States in 2013, there were an estimated 226,000 women and adolescents living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection (1). Women with HIV are living longer, healthier lives, so the need for routine and problem-focused gynecologic care has increased. The purpose of this document is to educate clinicians about basic health screening and care, family planning, prepregnancy care, and managing common gynecologic problems for women and adolescents who are infected with HIV. For information on screening guidelines, refer to the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologis...


Committee Opinion Number 747, August 2018

(Replaces Committee Opinion Number 607, August 2014)

ABSTRACT: The diagnosis of cancer in females younger than 20 years is rare, with the incidence of 17 cases per 100,000 individuals per year in the United States. Although advancements in cancer therapy have dramatically improved childhood cancer survival, gynecologists should be aware of the increased risk of adverse reproductive health effects from each type of therapy. Cancer and its treatment may have immediate or delayed adverse effects on reproductive health. Gynecologists may be consulted for the following issues: pubertal concerns; menstrual irregularities; heavy menstrual bleeding and...


Committee Opinion Number 512, December 2011

(Reaffirmed 2019)

ABSTRACT: Transgender individuals face harassment, discrimination, and rejection within our society. Lack of awareness, knowledge, and sensitivity in health care communities eventually leads to inadequate access to, underutilization of, and disparities within the health care system for this population. Although the care for these patients is often managed by a specialty team, obstetrician–gynecologists should be prepared to assist or refer transgender individuals with routine treatment and screening as well as hormonal and surgical therapies. The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecolo...


Committee Opinion Number 515, January 2012

(Reaffirmed 2018)

ABSTRACT: Sixty percent of American Indian and Alaska Native women live in metropolitan areas. Most are not eligible for health care provided by the federal Indian Health Service (IHS). The IHS partly funds 34 Urban Indian Health Organizations, which vary in size and services. Some are small informational and referral sites that are limited even in the scope of outpatient services provided. Compared with other urban populations, urban American Indian and Alaska Native women have higher rates of teenaged pregnancy, late or no prenatal care, and alcohol and tobacco use in pregnancy. Their infan...


Committee Opinion Number 547, December 2012

(Reaffirmed 2019)

Abstract: Military service is associated with unique risks to women’s reproductive health. As increasing numbers of women are serving in the military, and a greater proportion of United States Veterans are women, it is essential that obstetrician–-gynecologists are aware of and well prepared to address the unique health care needs of this demographic group. Obstetrician–-gynecologists should ask about women’s military service, know the Veteran status of their patients, and be aware of high prevalence problems (eg, posttraumatic stress disorder, intimate partner violence, and military sexual t...


Committee Opinion Number 772, March 2019

(Replaces Committee Opinion Number 661, April 2016)

ABSTRACT: Immunization against vaccine-preventable diseases is an essential component of women’s primary and preventive health care. Many studies have shown that a recommendation from an obstetrician–gynecologist or other health care provider for a vaccine is one of the strongest influences on patient acceptance. Obstetrician–gynecologists and other health care providers should develop a standard process for assessing and documenting the vaccination status of patients and for recommending and administering vaccines. If allowed by state law, obstetrician–gynecologists and other health care pro...


Members Only


Committee Opinion Number 250, January 2001

The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) Committee on Coding and Nomenclature believes that physicians must code accurately the services they provide and the diagnoses that justify those services for purposes of appropriate payment. This requirement is consistent with the rules established by the American Medical Association (AMA) Current Procedural Terminology Editorial Panel and published as the Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) and with those established by the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM), which are pub...


35.
December 2016

Members Only


Committee Opinion Number 352, December 2006

(Reaffirmed 2018)

ABSTRACT: Innovations in medical practice are critical to the advancement of medicine. Good clinicians constantly adapt and modify their clinical approaches in ways they believe will benefit patients. Innovative practice frequently is approached very differently from formal research, which is governed by distinct ethical and regulatory frameworks. Although opinions differ on the distinction between research and innovative practice, the production of generalizable knowledge is one defining characteristic of research. Physicians considering innovative practice must disclose to patients the purp...


Statement of Policy (Reaffirmed July 2014), July 2014

The problem of perinatal transmission of HIV infection was first appreciated in 1982. In 1991, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) recommended a policy of routine counseling and offering testing (with specific informed consent) for HIV infection to all pregnant women. Since 1991, there have been major advances in the treatment of HIV infection, including demonstration in 1994 of the efficacy of zidovudine to reduce perinatal transmission. The U.S. Public Health Service subsequently issued guidelines for use of zidovudine to reduce perinatal transmission and for counseling and voluntary testing fo...


(Reaffirmed July 2014)

The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (the College) and the American College of Nurse-Midwives (ACNM) affirm our shared goal of safe women's health care in the United States through the promotion of evidence-based models provided by obstetrician–gynecologists (ob-gyns), certified nurse-midwives (CNMs), and certified midwives (CMs). The College and ACNM believe health care is most effective when it occurs in a system that facilitates communication across care settings and among providers. Ob-gyns and CNMs/CMs are experts in their respective fields of practice and are educated...


Approved by the Executive Board May 2013; Revised and reaffirmed

Government serves a valuable role in the protection of public health and safety and the provision of essential health services. The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (the College) and the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) support this proper role of government. Laws that veer from these functions and unduly interfere with patient-physician relationships are not appropriate. Absent a substantial public.


Committee Opinion Number 743, July 2018

ABSTRACT: Low-dose aspirin has been used during pregnancy, most commonly to prevent or delay the onset of preeclampsia. The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists issued the Hypertension in Pregnancy Task Force Report recommending daily low-dose aspirin beginning in the late first trimester for women with a history of early-onset preeclampsia and preterm delivery at less than 34 0/7 weeks of gestation, or for women with more than one prior pregnancy complicated by preeclampsia. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force published a similar guideline, although the list of indications...


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