Practice Updates: Improving Awareness of and Screening for Health Risks Among Sex Workers, Breast Cancer Risk Assessment and Screening in Average-Risk Women


Stay up to date with ACOG's authoritative clinical guidance and helpful patient education materials. The following provides Practice Updates for June and July 2017.
 

TOPIC SPOTLIGHT

Featured Committee Opinion: Improving Awareness of and Screening for Health Risks Among Sex Workers

ACOG encourages nonjudgmental screening of all patients for sex work during sexual history-taking. Committee Opinion author Jennefer Russo, MD, MPH, notes that “Ob-gyns have a responsibility to offer women engaging in sex work the best comprehensive care for their needs.”

Due to its illegal nature and stigma, many sex workers do not immediately disclose their work, especially to physicians. To reduce barriers to disclosing sex work, ob-gyn offices should consider incorporating questions about sex in exchange for money, goods or services on self-administered history or intake forms completed by all patients. Following screening for sex work, ob-gyns must be prepared to treat, counsel, and educate patients about the attendant health risks, including sexually transmitted infections (STIs), sexual or physical violence, incarceration, and reproductive coercion.

Committee Opinion 708: Improving Awareness of and Screening for Health Risks Among Sex Workers is available in the July 2017 issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

 

Featured Practice Bulletin: Breast Cancer Risk Assessment and Screening in Average-Risk Women

ACOG’s guidance on breast cancer screening for average-risk women focuses on a patient-centered, individualized approach. Updated recommendations include that average-risk women be offered screening at age 40, or no later than 50 years. Screening should continue every one or two years until at least age 75. ACOG recommends that women and their ob-gyns engage in a dialogue that includes discussion of the woman’s health history; the benefits and harms of screening; and the woman’s concerns, priorities, values and preferences about the potential benefits and harms of screening. All screening decisions should be based on a shared decision making process between the patient and her ob-gyn.

Practice Bulletin 179: Breast Cancer Risk Assessment and Screening in Average-Risk Women is available in the July 2017 issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

Zika Information

ACOG’s Zika webpage

ACOG Zika Practice Advisory

ACOG Zika Toolkit, including patient education video, infographic, and assessment web tool endorsed by CDC

CDC’s Pregnancy and Zika Testing Clinical Algorithm

CDC Zika Virus Website

State Health Department Contact list for ob-gyns (members only) for questions on CDC’s Zika Registry

State Health Department Contact list for ob-gyns (members only) for questions on testing

CDC Zika Pregnancy Hotline for Health Care Providers: Ob-gyns can contact the CDC Zika Pregnancy Hotline at 770-488-7100, or email ZikaPregnancy@cdc.gov for any concerns related to clinical management or the US Zika Pregnancy Registry

Office of Population Affairs' Zika Toolkit



LIST OF NEW PRACTICE PUBLICATIONS, JUNE/JULY 2017

New Committee Opinions

 

See all Committee Opinions

                                                                                                                                  

New Practice Bulletins (members only)


See all Practice Bulletins


New Title: Clinical Updates in Women's Health Care (members only)

See all Clinical Updates Titles


New Patient Education Pamphlets (members only)

See all Patient Education Pamphlets


Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) for Patients

See all Frequently Asked Questions

American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists
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