ACOG in the News: "Gentle" C-Sections Are Becoming More Popular, What You Need to Know About New Breast Cancer Screening Rules, and 4 Ways the Senate Health Care Bill Would Hurt Women

ACOG serves as an expert information source about women’s health for consumers and the media. The organization’s Office of Communications regularly receives media inquiries from newspapers, magazines, websites, radio, and TV broadcast outlets. In many cases, ACOG officers and members talk with the media, working with the Office of Communications. Here are several recent articles that prominently featured ACOG guidance and experts. We’ve included excerpts and links to the original articles.

The Tennessean Tennessee doctor bucks conventional medical wisdom for pregnant addicts Dr. Mishka Terplan quoted

Guidelines from the American Society of Addiction Medicine and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, strongly advise against a cold turkey approach to pregnant addicts. Detoxing from opioids causes severe maternal and fetal stress, including high blood pressure, vomiting, nausea and severe 'flu like symptoms in mothers. It's also associated with an increased risk for relapse among mothers.

"While I understand the motivation for people like Dr. Towers, detox is incredibly unrealistic," said Dr. Mishka Terplan, a professor of obstetrics, gynecology and psychiatry at Virginia Commonwealth University. As a member of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists' workgroup on opioid addiction, he help craft their guidelines.

Associated Press Wisconsin Seeks Emergency Action in 'Cocaine Mom' Case

Opponents of the law, including the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, American Society of Addiction Medicine and American Public Health Association, argue it discourages pregnant women struggling with addiction from seeking prenatal care, is vague and overly punitive.

The law, passed in 1998, allows adult pregnant women suspected of drug or alcohol use that could affect their fetus to be held in custody and subjected to involuntary medical treatment. It is meant to provide protection for developing fetuses.


HealthDay
 Opioids Over-Prescribed After C-Sections: Studies

"We need to be conscious of what the consequences of routine opioid prescribing are -- not just for the patient but for anyone who might encounter her medicine cabinet," said Dr. Mishka Terplan. He's a member of the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists' Opioid and Addiction Medicine Work Group. 


Cosmopolitan magazine
 "Gentle" C-Sections Are Becoming More Popular

The approach — known as a "gentle C-section" or "natural C-section" — isn't new, but doctors are becoming more open to it. "More and more physicians here at the hospital are incorporating it, so I think it's a definite trend," Dr. Angelo Cumella, Fellow of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists at Northern Westchester Hospital in Mount Kisco, New York, told CNN. Plus, emerging research, conducted in 2016 by Germany-based researchers at Charité University Hospital in Berlin, speaks to the technique's advantages over the traditional surgery.


CNN 
Legionnaires' cases among newborns raise questions about water births

The incidences are rare but not surprising, said Dr. Joseph Wax, chairman of the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists Committee on Obstetric Practice.

"Waterborne infections with serious, even fatal, infant outcomes are a recognized complication associated with birth underwater," he said. "Appropriate measures, as suggested by the CDC report, will hopefully reduce such risks in women choosing to deliver underwater. Nonetheless, avoiding birth underwater is the best 


The Washington Post
 ‘How do I know my tampons are safe?’: More women push for detailed labels on feminine care products

In addition to pads and tampons, advocates are scrutinizing feminine hygiene products including douches, sprays, washes and wipes. These products are regulated as cosmetics, and manufacturers are required to print more detailed ingredients, but many of the products contain undisclosed added fragrances. The American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists recommends against using douches, because they are considered medically unnecessary and could increase the chance of bacterial infections or other problems.


NPR (All Things Considered and NPR's Shots Blog) 
OB-GYNs Give Women More Say In When They Have Mammograms 

Women in their 40s at average risk for breast cancer should talk to their health care provider about the risks and benefits of mammography before starting regular screening at that age, according to guidelines released Thursday by the American College of Obstetricians and GynecologistsBarbara Levy is the group's vice president of health policy. She joined us to explain the change.

The group had previously recommended annual mammograms starting at age 40. But the advice has changed to better incorporate input from the woman being screened, says physician Christopher Zahn, vice president of practice activities at ACOG. "A patient's preferences and values need to be an important part" of the decision, he says.


ABC's Good Morning America
 What You Need to Know About the New Breast Cancer Screening Rules

"Our senior medical contributor Dr. Jen Ashton is here to break it down. This comes from ACOG and this is the largest group of women's health professionals in the country and they issued these guidelines about screening for breast cancer and the average risk woman and stress patient autonomy and something called shared decision-making meaning what the woman and her health care provider go through talking about average risk women to start discussing mammogram screening at age 40 and to continue screening until at least 75 years of age."


TIME magazine
 4 Ways the Senate Health Care Bill Would Hurt Women

“This legislation deliberately strips the landmark women’s health gains made by the Affordable Care Act and would severely limit access to care,” said Dr. Haywood Brown, president of the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG), in a statement. “If enacted, this legislation will turn back the clock on women’s health.”

“The bill includes some money to boost community health centers as an alternative, but many of those centers don’t have the trained professionals who can provide long-acting contraceptives and ongoing health-care services that many women need,” says Dr. Hal Lawrence, executive vice president of ACOG. “They’re not equipped to fill that gap.”


The Washington Post
 The Daily 202: Senate Republicans want to get to yes on the health care bill

A chorus of providers warned that the Senate bill would “turn back the clock on women’s health.” “This legislation deliberately strips the landmark women’s health gains made by the Affordable Care Act and would severely limit access to care,” the president of the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists wrote in a statement.


CBS News
 Major Medical Groups Call for Rejection of Senate Health Bill Dr. Haywood Brown quoted

Women's health would be at risk too, said Dr. Haywood Brown, president of the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG). Among other things, the bill would defund Planned Parenthood.

"ACOG is deeply disappointed," said Brown, warning that the Senate plan "deliberately strips" gains made in women's health under the Affordable Care Act and that it would severely limit access to care.

American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists
409 12th Street SW, Washington, DC  20024-2188 | Mailing Address: PO Box 70620, Washington, DC 20024-9998