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Title Date
1.

Adolescent Confidentiality and Electronic Health Records

Number 599

Abstract: Confidentiality concerns are heightened during adolescence, and these concerns can be a critical barrier to adolescents in receiving appropriate health care. Health care providers caring for minors should be aware of federal and state laws that affect confidentiality. State statutes on t...

May 2014

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2.

Integrating Immunizations Into Practice

Number 558

ABSTRACT: Given demonstrated vaccine efficacy, safety, and the large potential for prevention of many infectious diseases among adults, newborns, and pregnant women, obstetrician–gynecologists should embrace immunizations as an integral part of their women’s health care practice. To provide direct...

April 2013

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3.

Health Care for Women in the Military and Women Veterans

Number 547

Abstract: Military service is associated with unique risks to women’s reproductive health. As increasing numbers of women are serving in the military, and a greater proportion of United States Veterans are women, it is essential that obstetrician–-gynecologists are aware of and well prepared to ad...

December 2012

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4.

Professional Relationships With Industry

Number 541

(Replaces No. 401, March 2008)

ABSTRACT: The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (the College) has a long history of leadership in ensuring that its educational mission is evidence based and unbiased. A predecessor to this Committee Opinion was published in 1985, making the College one of the first professional ...

November 2012

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5.

Well-Woman Visit

Number 534

(Reaffirmed 2014)

ABSTRACT: The annual health assessment (“annual examination”) is a fundamental part of medical care and is valuable in promoting prevention practices, recognizing risk factors for disease, identifying medical problems, and establishing the clinician–patient relationship. The annual health assessme...

August 2012

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6.

Health Care Systems for Underserved Women

Number 516

ABSTRACT: Underserved women are those who are unable to obtain quality health care by virtue of barriers created by poverty, cultural differences, race or ethnicity, geography, sexual orientation, gender identity, or other factors that contribute to health care inequities. With passage of the Pati...

January 2012

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7.

Health Care for Urban American Indian and Alaska Native Women

Number 515

(Reaffirmed 2013)

ABSTRACT: Sixty percent of American Indian and Alaska Native women live in metropolitan areas. Most are not eligible for health care provided by the federal Indian Health Service (IHS). The IHS partly funds 34 Urban Indian Health Organizations, which vary in size and services. Some are small infor...

January 2012

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8.

Health Care for Transgender Individuals

Number 512

ABSTRACT: Transgender individuals face harassment, discrimination, and rejection within our society. Lack of awareness, knowledge, and sensitivity in health care communities eventually leads to inadequate access to, underutilization of, and disparities within the health care system for this popula...

December 2011

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9.

Ethical Ways for Physicians to Market a Practice

Number 510

(Replaces No. 341, July 2006)

ABSTRACT: It is ethical for physicians to market their practices provided that the communication is truthful and not misleading, deceptive, or discriminatory. All paid advertising must be clearly identified as such. Producing fair and accurate advertising of medical practices and services can be c...

November 2011

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10.

Empathy in Womens Health Care

Number 480

(Reaffirmed 2014)

ABSTRACT: Empathy is the process through which one attempts to project oneself into another's life and imagine a situation from his or her point of view. Most individuals do have an innate capacity to show empathy toward others. Empathy is as important to being a good physician as technical compet...

March 2011

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11.

Patient Safety and the Electronic Health Record

Number 472

ABSTRACT: The electronic health record (EHR) has the potential to improve the quality, safety, and efficiency of patient care when fully implemented, yet adoption of this tool has been slow. The advantages of the EHR include facilitating improved communication between health care providers; assist...

November 2010

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12.

Ethical Decision Making in Obstetrics and Gynecology

Number 390

(Reaffirmed 2013)

ABSTRACT: Physicians vary widely in their familiarity with ethical theories and methods and their sensitivity toward ethical issues. It is important for physicians to improve their skills in addressing ethical questions. Obstetrician–gynecologists who are familiar with the concepts of medical ethi...

December 2007

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13.

Expert Testimony

Number 374

(Reaffirmed 2013)

ABSTRACT: It is the duty of obstetricians and gynecologists who testify as expert witnesses on behalf of defendants, the government, or plaintiffs to do so solely in accordance with their judgment on the merits of the case. Obstetrician–gynecologists must limit testimony to their sphere of medical...

August 2007

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14.

Sexual Misconduct

Number 373

ABSTRACT: The physician-patient relationship is damaged when there is either confusion regarding professional roles and behavior or clear lack of integrity that allows sexual exploitation and harm. Sexual contact or a romantic relationship between a physician and a current patient is always unethi...

August 2007

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15.

Institutional Responsibility to Provide Legal Representation

Number 370

(Reaffirmed 2012)

ABSTRACT: Hospitals, academic institutions, professional corporations, and other health care organizations should have policies and procedures by which alleged violations of professional behavior can be reported and investigated. These institutions should adopt policies on legal representation and...

July 2007

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16.

Seeking and Giving Consultation

Number 365

(Reaffirmed 2013)

ABSTRACT: Consultations usually are sought when practitioners with primary clinical responsibility recognize conditions or situations that are beyond their level of expertise or available resources. One way to maximize prompt, effective consultation and collegial relationships is to have a formal ...

May 2007

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17.

Commercial Enterprises in Medical Practice

Number 359

(Reaffirmed 2011)

ABSTRACT: Increasing numbers of physicians sell and promote both medical and nonmedical products as part of their practices. Physicians always have rendered advice and treatment for a fee, and this practice is appropriate. It is unethical under most circumstances, however, for physicians to sell o...

January 2007

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18.

Innovative Practice: Ethical Guidelines

Number 352

(Reaffirmed 2012)

ABSTRACT: Innovations in medical practice are critical to the advancement of medicine. Good clinicians constantly adapt and modify their clinical approaches in ways they believe will benefit patients. Innovative practice frequently is approached very differently from formal research, which is gove...

December 2006

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19.

Inappropriate Reimbursement Practices by Third-Party Payers

Number 250

The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) Committee on Coding and Nomenclature believes that physicians must code accurately the services they provide and the diagnoses that justify those services for purposes of appropriate payment. This requirement is consistent with the rul...

January 2001

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20.

Coding Responsibility

Number 249

(Reaffirmed 2005)

Physicians are responsible for accurately coding the services they provide to their patients. Likewise, insurers are obligated to process all legitimate insurance claims for covered services accurately and in a timely manner. It is inappropriate for physicians to code or for insurers to process cl...

January 2001

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