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Committee Opinion Number 660, March 2016

(Replaces Committee Opinion No. 397, February 2008)

ABSTRACT: Gestational surrogacy is an increasingly common form of family building that can allow individuals or a couple to become parents despite circumstances in which carrying a pregnancy is biologically impossible or medically contraindicated. The practice of gestational surrogacy involves a woman known as a gestational carrier who agrees to bear a genetically unrelated child with the help of assisted reproductive technologies for an individual or couple who intend(s) to be the legal and rearing parent(s), referred to as the intended parent(s). Obstetrician–gynecologists may become involv...


2.
January 2015

Committee Opinion Number 618, January 2015

ABSTRACT: The main goal of ovarian reserve testing is to identify those individuals who are at risk of decreased or diminished ovarian reserve, commonly known as DOR. Although ovarian reserve testing cannot predict the end of one’s reproductive years, results outside the range expected for a patient’s age can encourage the individual to pursue more aggressive treatment options to achieve pregnancy. Ovarian reserve testing should be performed for women older than 35 years who have not conceived after 6 months of attempting pregnancy and women at higher risk of diminished ovarian reserve. When ...


Committee Opinion Number 605, July 2014

(Reaffirmed 2016)

ABSTRACT: Primary ovarian insufficiency is the depletion or dysfunction of ovarian follicles with cessation of menses before age 40 years. There is no consensus on criteria to identify primary ovarian insufficiency in adolescents, and delay in diagnosis is common. Health care providers who make this clinical diagnosis should be mindful of the sensitive nature of this medical condition. Patients and their families should be counseled on the effect of the patient’s condition on future fertility, on the risk of comorbidities associated with primary ovarian insufficiency, and on the condition’s p...


Committee Opinion Number 589, March 2014

(Reaffirmed 2016. Replaces Committee Opinion Number 413, August 2008)

ABSTRACT: The fecundity of women decreases gradually but significantly beginning approximately at age 32 years and decreases more rapidly after age 37 years. Education and enhanced awareness of the effect of age on fertility are essential in counseling the patient who desires pregnancy. Given the anticipated age-related decline in fertility, the increased incidence of disorders that impair fertility, and the higher risk of pregnancy loss, women older than 35 years should receive an expedited evaluation and undergo treatment after 6 months of failed attempts to conceive or earlier, if clinical...


5.
January 2014

Committee Opinion Number 584, January 2014

(Reaffirmed 2016)

ABSTRACT: In 2013, the American Society for Reproductive Medicine and the Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology published a joint document, Mature Oocyte Cryopreservation: A Guideline, which addresses advances in techniques to freeze human eggs that have resulted in significant recent improvements in pregnancy success. Based on the current state of evidence, modern procedures to cryopreserve oocytes should no longer be considered experimental. The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists’ Committee on Gynecologic Practice endorses the joint document and encourages its use by...


Committee Opinion Number 553, February 2013

(Reaffirmed 2016. Replaces Committee Opinion Number 369, June 2007)

ABSTRACT: Fertility treatments have contributed significantly to the increase in multifetal pregnancies. The first approach to the problem of multifetal pregnancies should be prevention, and strategies to limit multifetal pregnancies, especially high-order multifetal pregnancies, should be practiced by all physicians who treat women for infertility. Incorporating the ethical frameworks presented in this Committee Opinion will help physicians counsel and guide patients when making decisions regarding multifetal pregnancy reduction. In cases of high-order multifetal pregnancies, counseling shou...


7.
June 2012

Committee Opinion Number 528, June 2012

(Replaces No. 368, June 2007, Reaffirmed 2015)

ABSTRACT: Obstetrician–gynecologists may find themselves at the center of adoption issues because of their expertise in the assessment and management of infertility, pregnancy, and childbirth. The lack of clarity about both ethical issues and legal consequences may create challenges for physicians. Therefore, the Committee on Ethics of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists discusses ethical issues, proposes safeguards, and makes recommendations regarding the role of the physician in adoption.


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