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Committee Opinion Number 275, September 2002

(Replaces No. 121, April 1993, Reaffirmed 2016)

ABSTRACT: Effective rehabilitation and modern reproductive technology may increase the number of women considering pregnancy who have spinal cord injuries (SCIs). It is important that obstetricians caring for these patients are aware of the specific problems related to SCIs. Autonomic dysreflexia is the most significant medical complication seen in women with SCIs, and precautions should be taken to avoid stimuli that can lead to this potentially fatal syndrome. Women with SCIs may give birth vaginally, but when cesarean delivery is indicated, adequate anesthesia (spinal or epidural if possib...


202.
March 2001

Committee Opinion Number 253, March 2001

(Replaces Statement of Policy on Liposuction, January 1988, Reaffirmed 2015)

Cosmetic procedures (such as laser hair removal, body piercing, tattoo removal, and liposuction) are not considered gynecologic procedures and, therefore, generally are not taught in approved obstetric and gynecologic residencies. Because these are not considered gynecologic procedures, it is inappropriate for the College to establish guidelines for training. As with other surgical procedures, credentialing for cosmetic procedures should be based on education, training, experience, and demonstrated competence.


Committee Opinion Number 250, January 2001

The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) Committee on Coding and Nomenclature believes that physicians must code accurately the services they provide and the diagnoses that justify those services for purposes of appropriate payment. This requirement is consistent with the rules established by the American Medical Association (AMA) Current Procedural Terminology Editorial Panel and published as the Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) and with those established by the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM), which are pub...


204.
January 2001

Committee Opinion Number 249, January 2001

(Reaffirmed 2005)

Physicians are responsible for accurately coding the services they provide to their patients. Likewise, insurers are obligated to process all legitimate insurance claims for covered services accurately and in a timely manner. It is inappropriate for physicians to code or for insurers to process claims incorrectly in order to enhance or reduce reimbursement. When either party engages in such a practice intentionally and repetitively, it should be considered dishonest and may be subject to civil and criminal penalties.


Committee Opinion Number 234, May 2000

(Replaces No. 219, August 1999, Reaffirmed 2015)

Prevention of transmission of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) from mother to fetus or newborn (vertical transmission) is a major goal in the care of pregnant women infected with HIV. An important advance in this regard was the demonstration that treatment of the mother with zidovudine (ZDV) during pregnancy and labor and of the neonate for the first 6 weeks after birth could reduce the transmission rate from 25% to 8% (1). Continuing research into vertical transmission of HIV suggests that a substantial number of cases occur as the result of fetal exposure to the virus during labor a...


Committee Opinion Number 205, August 1998

Tubal ligation at the time of cesarean delivery requires significant additional physician work even though the technical work of the procedure is brief. Informed consent by the patient requires considerably more counseling by the physician regarding potential risks and benefits of this procedure than is necessary with alternative means of sterilization and contraception. Also, many states require completion of special informed consent documents in addition to the customary consent forms required by hospitals. These forms must be completed before scheduling the procedure.


American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists
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