Featured Practice Bulletin

Prevention and Management of Obstetric Lacerations at Vaginal Delivery

Lacerations are common after vaginal birth. Trauma can occur on the cervix, vagina, and vulva, including the labial, periclitoral, and periurethral regions, and the perineum. Most of these lacerations do not result in adverse functional outcomes. Severe perineal lacerations, extending into or through the anal sphincter complex, although less frequent, are more commonly associated with increased risk of pelvic floor injury, fecal and urinary incontinence, pain, and sexual dysfunction with symptoms that may persist or be present many years after giving birth. The purpose of this document is to provide evidence-based guidelines for the prevention, identification, and repair of obstetric lacerations and for episiotomy.

PROLOG

Each of the 5 units of PROLOG addresses a major area in obstetrics and gynecology and consists of two parts—an assessment book and a critique book. Put your knowledge to the test and earn CME credits.

For purchasing information, please visit the Online Bookstore.

ACOG eModules

PROLOG eModules

ACOG eModules is an online self-evaluation and learning program. Each module offers testing, rich discussion, and CME.

www.acog.org/eModules

Coding Resources

Coding with ACOG

Learn how to code claims faster and more accurately with ACOG’s Coding Resources.

Coding Resources

American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists
409 12th Street SW, Washington, DC  20024-2188 | Mailing Address: PO Box 70620, Washington, DC 20024-9998