Search Results

Results 1–4 of 4
Sort By: Relevance| Date| Title

PFSI011 Mosquito Bite Prevention If you must travel to one of the areas where Zika virus is spreading, strictly follow these four steps to prevent mosquito bites:  Use EPA-registered bug spray with DEET, picaridin, IR3535, oil of lemon eucalyptus, paramenthane-diol, or 2-undecanone. Used as directed, these sprays are safe for pregnant and breastfeeding women.  Wear long-sleeved shirts and long pants.  Treat clothing and gear with permethrin or buy permethrin-treated items.  Stay in air-conditioned or screened-in areas during the day and at night. Follow these steps at all ...


PFSI010 ››› Weeks 1–4 Weeks 5–8 Weeks 9–12 Weeks 13–16 Weeks 17–20 Weeks 21–24 • Timing: 10–13 weeks • Blood test plus NT ultrasound exam • Screens for Down • syndrome and trisomy 18 First-trimester screening Second-trimester screening (“quad screen”) • Timing: 15–22 weeks • Blood test • Screens for Down syndrome, trisomy 13, trisomy 18, and NTDs Standard ultrasound exam • Timing: 18–22 weeks • Screens for some physical defects Integrated screening and sequential screening • Timing: 10–22 weeks • Combines first-trimester and second-trimester screening test results in vari...


PFSI009 Your ob-gyn or other health care professional takes a sample of cervical cells and sends them to a lab for testing: • For a Pap test, the sample is tested to see if abnormal cells are present. • For an HPV test, the sample is tested for infection with HPV types linked to cancer. If you are younger than 21 years  You do not need screening.  If you are aged 21–29 years  Have a Pap test every 3 years.  If you are aged 30 –65 years Have a Pap test + an HPV test (co-testing) every 5 years (preferred) or a Pap test alone every 3 years.   If you are 65 years or older ...


PFS005, August 2015

Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is the virus that causes acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). HIV can enter the bloodstream through contact with an infected person’s body fluids, such as blood or semen. This can happen during sex or by sharing needles used to inject drugs. An infected woman who is pregnant can pass the virus to her baby. Women with HIV who breastfeed also can pass the virus to their babies. Once in the blood, HIV attacks the immune system. As the immune system weakens, the body becomes less able to resist disease and other infections. AIDS is diagnosed when a perso...


American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists
409 12th Street SW, Washington, DC  20024-2188 | Mailing Address: PO Box 70620, Washington, DC 20024-9998