Patient Safety Information

January 2013

Patient safety and quality improvement update
Michael L. Nix, MD, District XI Committee on Patient Safety and Quality Improvement

The Committee for Patient Safety and Quality Improvement (CPSQI) for ACOG District XI has started a list of contacts in hospitals within Texas to establish an open line of communication in order to improve women’s health care in Texas. 

Notification of Available Resources

Request for Pitocin Protocols

  • I am requesting that hospitals provide our Patient Safety Committee with examples of their Pitocin protocols within Texas. Our Fellows within Texas typically are interested on what is being done on a more local level. If your hospital is willing to release these protocols, the Committee would like to review them and release best examples on our website. These can be sent to info@tx.acog.org.


July 2012

DXI Sample Protocols for Magnesium for Neuroprotection 
In March of 2010, the ACOG Committee on Obstetric Practice published CO # 455: Magnesium Sulfate Before Anticipated Preterm Birth for Neuroprotection. The District XI Committee on Patient Safety and Quality Improvement (CPSQI) has collected examples of Texas hospital policies pertaining to the administration of magnesium for neuroprotection.


August 2011

Click here for a full summary of the District XI Patient Safety Survey.

Patient safety and quality improvement update
Michael L. Nix, MD, District XI Committee on Patient Safety and Quality Improvement

Thank you to everyone who responded to the recent District XI Patient Safety Survey. Information from this survey will be used to provide tools and resources for our members.

The 225 respondents represented a broad range of Fellows and Junior Fellows in various practices, with the majority in private practice and in communities with populations greater than 50,000 people. A full summary of the survey results can be found on the District XI website (click on “District XI” at acog.org/acog_districts).

While significant strides in patient safety and quality improvement are being made, notable barriers remain including:

  • Insufficient methods of measuring and monitoring outcomes
  • Expense of technology and/or systems
  • Lack of knowledge of methods that institute system-level change
  • Lack of knowledge of patient safety principles

Some of these barriers are being addressed by ACOG with its postgraduate program, “Quality and Safety for Leaders in Women’s Health Care.” The course is provided by The College’s Committee on Patient Safety and Quality Improvement and is offered twice a year. I recently attended the program and highly recommend it. The next course is scheduled for November 10–12 in New Orleans, LA.

Additionally, the ACOG Voluntary Review of Quality of Care Program provides peer review consultation to departments of ob-gyn, assesses the quality of care provided, and suggests possible alternative actions for improvement. Information on both of these programs can be found on the ACOG website (acog.org).

Finally, we are in the process of gathering a list of safety experts in Texas—if you are interested, please send your contact information to info@tx.acog.org.

Contact:

Sarah Rayburn
Webmaster
srayburn@acog.org

ACOG District XI:
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