NRMP Match 2014

NRMP Match 2014: OBGYN Remains Competitive and Desirable

by Mark B. Woodland, MS, MD
Program Director OBGYN DUCOM
Vice Dean GME DUCOM

A year after the NRMP went for “all in,” which means that most institutions opted for including all of their open PGY1 spots for the match, and the number of US graduates was predicted to reach the level of the number of available GME slots, we have had a very enthusiastic and energetic response in OBGYN. Nearly all of the 1, 242 spots offered in all regions of the country was completed with only 17 spots unfilled after the Main Match.  Eight of these were listed in the northeastern region. The SOAP (Supplemental Offer and Acceptance Program) ran after the Main Match and reportedly filled these remaining spots. Newly listed for this year were the OBGYN Preliminary program spots. These are 1st year spots that do not go on to continued categorical spots in the programs.

Match Summary 2014 OBGYN

 OBGYN

 

 

# of Applicants 

# of Matches 

% Filled 

Ranked Positions 

 # of Programs

 

Positions Offered

 

Unfilled Programs 

 US Seniors

Total 

US Seniors 

Total 

 US Seniors

 Total

 US
Seniors

Total 

 249

1,242 

5 (17 positions) 

1,073 

1,788 

950 

1,234 

76.5 

99.4 

12,031 

15,815 

 

 

 193 not matched

554 not matched 

 

 

12 ranks per applicant 

9 ranks per applicant 

 OBGYN PGY1 Prelim

 

# of Applicants 

# of Matches 

% Filled 

Ranked Positions 

 # of Programs

Positions Offered 

 Unfilled Programs

US
Seniors 

 Total

US Seniors 

Total 

US Seniors

 

 Total

US
Seniors 

Total 

 18

22 

51 

145 

13 

18.2 

59.1 

70 

190 

Concerns raised by this year’s match include the following:

  • The number of spots in OBGYN decreased by 17 while the number of applicants remained steady (and actually increased by 5)
  • The number of applicants unmatched in OBGYN (a total of 677 this year compared to  650 last year), particularly the number of unmatched US graduates ( a total of 123 this year compared to 115 last year)
  • The number of ranks per applicant
  • The cost of interviewing at more programs in order to secure a match
  • The likelihood of securing a match in a subsequent year, and
  • The debt incurred by students who do not match. 

Overall, there were 26,676 positions offered in this year’s match for 52,665 applicants, of which 25,710 were US seniors. With the push of the AAMC to increase the number of US graduates, this number is slated to exceed the number of available GME slots in the US by 2015. This presents a real dilemma for students in school already incurring debt for their education.

As our economy continues to contract, the likelihood that we will be putting more money into GME is poor and the risk is that there will be even fewer positions available for our applicants. Additionally, we need to consider the number of programs that our students are applying to and the cost of that application process. Perhaps the time has come to offer video interviews to applicants who are far away in order to facilitate an interview with the program, but limit the expense. Finally, we need to consider career options and debt management for our students who will go unmatched. Truly, the upcoming match years will have to be monitored very closely.