Message from the chair

Dr. Laurie C. GreggLaurie C. Gregg, MD

Gratitude can be defined in a number of ways. It is the readiness to acknowledge and return kindness. It is the appreciation of what is valuable and meaningful to you. Numerous research studies demonstrate that gratitude has been associated with an enhanced sense of wellbeing.

My initial exposure to organized medicine began with the American Medical Student Association’s Humanistic Task Force and the ACOG Resident Reporter program. Years later, I became chair of the District IX Wellness Committee, and now I am chair of District IX. Although chair duties have filled my time with much more than volunteer hours dedicated to humanism and wellness, I am grateful to ACOG for nurturing me throughout my leadership journey. The organization has made a commitment to leadership development for any member who expresses an interest.

The Task Force on Leadership in the 21st Century implemented by past ACOG President James T. Breeden (with continued guidance from ACOG Immediate Past President Jeanne A. Conry, MD, PhD, who is also immediate past District IX chair) remains committed to increasing the involvement of ACOG members and making leadership opportunities more transparent. The Robert C. Cefalo National Leadership Institute is a wonderful example of the leadership education that ACOG provides.

I am grateful that ACOG works day in and day out to improve women’s health and to support the physicians who provide women’s health care. At the Annual Clinical Meeting, ideas for improving outreach and assistance to Fellows in the trenches were discussed. Candidates for office will be asked how the value of an ACOG membership can be made more evident or increased. ACOG members can view their benefits on the ACOG website.

I am grateful for all the individuals who dedicate time to ACOG’s work. From Junior Fellows volunteering their time in communities to Fellows serving on the ACOG Executive Board, everyone is focused on advancing the mission and vision of the organization.

I am grateful for friendship and mentors. Work can be demanding, but it is offset by being in the presence of friends. The relationships I’ve developed in my time serving ACOG are invaluable. My ACOG colleagues are members of my team, but more importantly they are my friends. Although there are many people to whom I send my gratitude, Dr. Conry deserves special recognition. I can only hope to learn from the example she has set and mentor others as well as she has mentored me.

My advice is to take time to be grateful, keep a journal about experiences for which you are grateful, and be mindful about your gratitude. Know that you can be grateful for the role ACOG plays in our specialty and that the organization will continue to strive to improve. And, if you would like to feel the gratitude of serving ACOG, contact one of your district or section officers. We will be happy to assist you in getting involved.